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I have a emp table as follows

empnum deptno salary
----- ------ ------
1      null    null
null   2       null
null   null    null
null   null    3
5      null    4
null   6       1  

I want the result set should be like

result
------
1
2
0
3
5
4
6
1

If there are 3 nulls it should display 0,
if there is only one null it should display the other two values in the same sequence in which they were inserted,
if there are '2 nulls' then it should display the one value in result set.

I have tried

select rs from  
((select decode(empno||deptno||sal,null,0,substr(empno||deptno||sal,1,1)as rs,rowid as ri from emp)
union  
((select decode(empno||deptno||sal,null,0,substr(empno||deptno||sal,2,1)as rs,rowid as ri from emp)  
minus  
(select decode(empno||deptno||sal,null,0,substr(empno||deptno||sal,1,1)as rs,rowid as ri from emp)))  
where rs is not null  
order by ri,rs;

the above query gives result as

rs
--
1
2
0
3
4
5
1
6

can any one help me out in getting the exact result set as mentioned above.

Thanks in advance..

share|improve this question
3  
A heap organized table is inherently unordered. How do you know what order the rows were inserted? Is there an additional column (i.e. a DATE or a TIMESTAMP) that isn't in your example that tells you when the row was inserted? A ROWID is a physical address, it has no relationship to the order in which rows were inserted. –  Justin Cave Jun 26 '12 at 17:47
    
If there's no timestamp, oracle does provide the ROWSCN pseudocolumn which can tell you the last time the block that this row is in was modified. If you haven't ever updated the table, you might be able to use this to get some idea of the order, but not a very good one. –  N West Jun 26 '12 at 17:50
    
@JustinCave I know that ROWID doesn't has any physical relation with the order in which records were inserted but we can order the result set using rowid as i have done above . –  Aspirant Jun 26 '12 at 17:53
    
You need a timestamp on the record to know for certain when it was inserted... –  N West Jun 26 '12 at 17:55
2  
@Aspirant - Yes, you can order by ROWID. That is not meaningful-- it certainly doesn't guarantee that you'll get the rows that were inserted first to be first in the result set or that the order of rows will be fixed over time. How do you determine that 5 comes before 4 and 6 comes before 1 by just looking at the data? –  Justin Cave Jun 26 '12 at 18:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This answer is HIGHLY dependent on how your table was created. It needs to be created with ROWDEPENDENCIES, and there needs to be a COMMIT after each insert to ensure that order maintained.

This is likely not useful with real-world data. If you didn't store a time stamp in your table for the insert time of the record, there is NO WAY to determine the order of the column.

With sample table and data:

create table emp
(empnum int, deptno int, salary int) ROWDEPENDENCIES;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(1,      null,    null); 
commit;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(null,   2,       null);
commit;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(null,   null  ,  null); 
commit;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(null ,  null ,   3); 
commit;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(5     , null,    4);
commit;
insert into emp (empnum, deptno, salary) values
(null   ,6 ,      1  ); 
commit;

create table emp2
(empnum int, deptno int, salary int, rowscn int) ROWDEPENDENCIES;
insert into emp2
select empnum, deptno, salary, ora_rowscn from emp;

You can then use the ORA_ROWSCN pseudocolumn to determine the insert date:

with countqry as
(select empnum, deptno, salary, 
        rowscn,
        decode(empnum, null, 0, 1) e,
        decode(deptno, null, 0, 1) d,
        decode(salary, null, 0, 1) s    
from emp2)
select 0 as val, rowscn 
from countqry where e+d+s = 0
union  all
select coalesce(empnum, deptno, salary) as val, 
       rowscn
from countqry where e+d+s = 1
union all 
select val, rowscn from
(
select * from 
  (select empnum, deptno, salary, rowscn 
    from countqry where e+d+s >= 2)
unpivot (val for x in (empnum as '1', deptno as '2', salary as '3'))
order by rowscn, val
)
order by rowscn

Here is a working example on SQLFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, you didn't specify how the pivoted columns should be ordered, but it appears they are ordered by the value itself, so that's the way I did it. –  N West Jun 26 '12 at 18:33

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