Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi guys i'm writing some c# code that is currently supposed to run as fast as possible, usually taking up a single core at 100% for about 25min. I need the code to remain single core as the benefit of running this code across multiple cores will not be as great as running this project multiple times concurrently

The code in question is as follows

public Double UpdateStuff(){

    ClassA[] CAArray = ClassA[*a very large number indeed*];
    Double Value = 0;
    int length = CAArray.Length;

    for (int i= 0; i< length ; i++)
        {
         Value += CAArray[i].ClassB.Value * CAArray[i].Multiplier;
        }  
    return Value;
}

This area of the code is responsible for 78% of the load of the application according to profilers and thus seems a good candidate for optimisation.

!!!Note : the function has been changed from return type void to return type Double, this is pseudocode and not actual code to allow easier reading

To Clarify: .net, c#4.0, visual studio 2010, target machine : windows server 2008 x64

Edit: Further clarification : all variables in this context are public and not properties. The values in CAArray[i].ClassB.Value will be forever changing doubles that cannot be pair matched.

share|improve this question
    
Please see "Stack Overflow does not allow tags in titles". –  John Saunders Jun 26 '12 at 18:53
4  
What types are ClassA.Multiplier and ClassB.Value? How are the getters for those properties defined? –  Karl-Johan Sjögren Jun 26 '12 at 18:57
2  
"running this code across multiple cores will not be as great as running this project multiple times" <-- why is this? –  Didaxis Jun 26 '12 at 19:06
1  
I read once an interesting answer. You could split your array in 4 different ones and run 4 parallel processes to sum parts, and then sum the 4 results. –  Sebas Jun 26 '12 at 19:12
1  
@S_BatMan, there are a few things about this question that make me suspicious whether this code is actually the problem. E.g. it doesn't actually do anything because it's declared void. Your reply to @ErOx is based on supposition not data. You're not telling us what ClassA is or what fills it. The code shown could be the bottleneck, but since it won't compile or do anything, you are obviously not showing us everything. –  Dour High Arch Jun 26 '12 at 20:01

11 Answers 11

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should remove this:

int length = CAArray.Length;

and replace the loop with this:

for (int i= 0; i < CAArray.Length; i++)
{
    Value += CAArray[i].ClassB.Value * CAArray[i].Multiplier;
} 

Storing the length like your original code does actually slows down C# code (counter-intuitive, I know). This is because if you have Array.Length directly in the for loop, the jitter will skip doing an array bounds-check on each iteration of the loop.

Also, I strongly suggest parallelizing this process. The simplest way to do this is

CAArray.AsParallel().Sum(i => i.ClassB.Value * i.Multiplier);

although you could potentially get even more speed without LINQ (though you then need to worry about the low level details of managing multiple threads).

share|improve this answer
    
I was disappointed that the accepted answer (and most-voted) didn't mention this. +1 –  ChimeraObscura Jun 28 '12 at 16:56

Try:

for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
{
    var a = CAArray[i];
    Value += a.ClassB.Value * a.Multiplier;
}  
share|improve this answer
    
How will this optimise this code? –  Nikhil Agrawal Jun 26 '12 at 18:56
2  
Only one index access in iteration loop. –  Tigran Jun 26 '12 at 18:56
    
Array accessing is very fast. I doubt this will bring a great improvement. –  Tim S. Jun 26 '12 at 18:57
    
@TimS.: the question is about micro optimizations. There is no much space to change something here. –  Tigran Jun 26 '12 at 18:58
2  
@jonnyGold It's a good habit to declare the variables only when you really need them - improves readability and apparently doesn't hit performance (almost never). –  Yorye Nathan Jun 26 '12 at 19:07

One difference is using a temporary variable inside the for loop, to hold the current value.

The second difference, probably more important, is putting CAArray.Length instead of count in the for-loop boundary. The compiler optimizes a loop like that to eliminate boundary checks.

for (int i = 0; i < CAArray.Length; i++)
{
    var curr = CAArray[i];
    Value += curr.ClassB.Value * curr.Multiplier;
}

Another thing you could do is making the ClassB, ClassB.Value and Multiplier properties as fields, if you can.

Last - remember to check the "Optimize Code" in the solution's properties to let the compiler, well, optimize your code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for reasoning of moving .Length to be in for. –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 26 '12 at 19:10

Another micro optimization, that can by the way impact on performance on very large sets, is defining a field, instead of property.

for (int i= 0; i< length ; i++)
{
    var a = CAArray[i];
    Value += a.ClassB.value_field * a.multiplier_field;
}  

Even if using properties is suggested guideline from MS, it's well known that properties introduce very small (but could be relevant on very big datas) overhead.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 as idea to try, but I expect JIT to inline simple properties. So try and carefully profile, swithc if see significant benifit. –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 26 '12 at 19:09

If you have much duplication wrt multiplier and ClassB.Values you might want to find all the distinct pairs, multiply each pair once and then multiply by the number of occurences of this pair.

Also, I would go for AsParallel() and use all the cores.

share|improve this answer
    
I doubt that distincting elements will take less time than just multiplying every single one. –  Yorye Nathan Jun 26 '12 at 19:03
    
Maybe the grouping is available somewhere upstream and could be reused. Hard to tell without knowing the distribution of data. –  Jakub Konecki Jun 26 '12 at 19:06
    
Whilst this is a great suggestion i have stated that i would like it to remain single core , also the values will be forever changing and thus this wont be possible –  S_BatMan Jun 26 '12 at 19:46

I don't know how much control you have over ClassA but it seems to me that since Multiplier and ClassB are properties of ClassA you should modify ClassA to have a property of this calculated value. Theoretically you already have all of these classes instantiated with their respective properties already set and as such you can easily calculate the desired value of this.ClassB.Value * this.Multiplier at the setting of ClassB.Value or Multiplier. In that way you are reducing the cost of this loop and instead moving it towards the instantiating of your data. Is this a worthwhile trade-off? You'll need to know more about what is going on in your application to decide but it will reduce the workload of this particular function. Afterwards all you'll need to do is:

public void UpdateStuff(){

    ClassA[] CAArray = ClassA[*a very large number indeed*];
    Double Value = 0;
    int length = CAArray.Length;

    for (int i= 0; i< length ; i++)
    {
        Value += CAArray[i].MultipliedClassBValue;
    }
return Value;
}

plus whatever further improvements the fine people here can come up with.

share|improve this answer
    
Whilst this was my first approach, due to the value within class b and the multiplier value changing every tick before this code is run moving the calculation up stream did not speed things up –  S_BatMan Jun 26 '12 at 19:53
    
@S_BatMan: In your approach, was the multiplication happening on the read of MultipliedValue or the write of the values? –  Austin Salonen Jun 26 '12 at 19:58
    
@Austin On the adjustment of CAArray[i].mutiplier as doing it inside CAArray[i].classb takes the variable an additional step away from the function –  S_BatMan Jun 26 '12 at 20:04

Another slight improvement would be using preincrement for index because postincrement must return the value the iterator had BEFORE it was incrementing; so, that previous value needs to be copied somewhere before altering it with the increment proper, so it's available to return.

The extra work may be a little or a lot, but it certainly can't be less than zero, compared to a preincrement, which can simply perform the incrementing and then return the just-altered value -- no copying // saving // etc necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I think jitter takes care of that. –  Jakub Konecki Jun 26 '12 at 19:08
    
afaik this is covered by JIT, thanks though –  S_BatMan Jun 26 '12 at 19:53
  1. Parallelize it.
  2. Try unrolling the loop. (The compiler might do this on its own.)
share|improve this answer

One more thing to be careful - if you often allocating really large arrays (86K+ of data) and size is different each time you may be stressing GC too much as this objects are allocated on LOH.

share|improve this answer

Since the array has huge number of elements, something like this will be faster than other methods of iterating over the loop.

try
{
    for (int i= 0; ; i++)
    {
        var a = CAArray[i];
        Value += a.ClassB.value_field * a.multiplier_field;
    }
}
catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
{ }

Though admittedly it looks rather ugly and is definitely not a 'pure' way of programming. But at the same time using public fields instead of properties is not pure as well.

In addition to gains from removing the exit condition, a curious bug in CLR 2.0 for X86, makes the for loop run faster if it is enclosed by try catch as Jitter in that case somehow prefers to use registers over CPU stack to store locals.

share|improve this answer

First off, its a void, so it shouldn't return anything (or it should return a Double). Second, C# generally doesn't use Egyptian braces - but that doesn't matter really.

Then you could try using Linq and lambdas, I think it may be faster - cleaner at least!

public void UpdateStuff()
{
    ClassA[] CAArray = new ClassA[large_number];
    Double Value = CAArray.Select(x => x.ClassB.Value * x.Multiplier).Sum();
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 - how do you think Select and Sum are implemented? –  Jakub Konecki Jun 26 '12 at 19:02
    
Linq tends to slow things down. It's cleaner, usually, but slower -- you're no longer just using an int to iterate; you're now making method calls on an object, which could make method calls on another object...etc etc etc. –  cHao Jun 26 '12 at 19:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.