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In my current framework's design, I peruse all types of specific assemblies and do work based on the types found. The assemblies it searches through are determined by the application bootstrapper/initializer. The assemblies are compiled in, so they can be strongly referenced via: typeof(SomeTypeInTheAssembly).Assembly. This is nice because the bootstrapper code has a strong reference to a type in the assembly and there's no fumbling about with fully qualified names as inline strings which need to be manually kept up-to-date if the assembly qualified name changes. But I didn't like referencing some completely unrelated type in the assembly and being dependant on that type being there. (what if it moves to another assembly? What if we deprecate/delete the type? Change its namespace?) In the code, it looks a bit weird too:

FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(typeof(SomeAssemblyNamespace.SubNamespace.GraphingCalculator).Assembly);

Now in my bootstrapping code, I have a direct dependency (although a pretty trivial dependency) on GraphingCalculator which has nothing to do with the bootstrapping stage (and as a GraphingCalculator, it certainly has nothing to do with obtaining assembly references). To avoid this, in each assembly I intend to use in this way, I added a class in their root:

namespace SomeAssemblyNamespace
{
    public static class AssemblyReference
    {
        public static System.Reflection.Assembly Get
        {
            get
            {
                return typeof(AssemblyReference).Assembly;
            }
        }
    }
}

Which isn't too bad because then my bootstrapping code looks like:

FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(SomeAssembly.AssemblyReference.Get);

But now, I have about a dozen or so assemblies with this AssemblyReference class copy/pasted and I only expect it to continue to grow as applications are built ontop of the framework. So my question is, is there a nice way to avoid the AssemblyReference class duplication and still programmatically pass in assembly references to the base framework, yet avoid the fuzziness of pointing to some arbitrary/unrelated type in the target assembly? My googlings seem to tell me that there's no API or language feature that lets me strongly point to an assembly (like typeof for classes), but I'm hoping someone here has come up with a better solution than I have that avoids the class/code duplication. Also of note, the code is sometimes compiled against Silverlight so I know that can tend to limit some of the API/techniques. Thanks!

EDIT: Just to add another monkey wrench, based on answer by "the coon", I should mention that I don't always load the same assemblies. For example, I might have a "CarBuilding" assembly that's applicable for some applications but not all. It's up to the bootstrappers to tell me which ones they wish to use (along with any custom ones the developer is employing)

EDITx2: To answer Jon Skeet's question: Clients (or us internally) will create any projects/DLLs they wish to support their application. In turn, these projects will reference the internal base framework. Their projects may contain resources (3D files, images, text, localization, etc.) and plugin-esque classes (they implement scripts which we discover and instantiate/execute as needed during the lifetime of the application). Additionally, our system supplies optional modules (DLLs) which contain reusable plugins/content which clients (or us) can leverage when making specific applications. So you might see a project structure like:

Solution
    ->MyAppBootstrapper_Android
        ->MyAppGUI_Android
        ->MyAppFramework
        ->MyAppResources
        ->MyAppAdditionalResources_Android

    ->MyAppBootstrapper_Silverlight
        ->MyAppGUI_Silverlight
        ->MyAppFramework
        ->MyAppResources
        ->MyAppAdditionalResources_Silverlight
        ->BaseFrameworkGraphingModule

The bootstrapper projects wire up dependencies and provide which projects/dlls (assemblies) should be provided to the base framework for discovery. Note that in this case, "MyApp" shares its own mini-framework and shared resources across both Android and Silverlight builds, but both have their own references independent from one another. The Silverlight one takes advantage of the BaseFrameworkGraphingModule and they have their own resources specific to the platform.

So in the bootstrappers in the projects look something like (albeit simplified):

namespace MyAppBootstrapper_Android
{
    public class Bootstrapper
    {
        public void Setup()
        {
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppGUI_Android.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppFramework.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppResources.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppAdditionalResources_Android.AssemblyReference.Get);
        }
    }
}

namespace MyAppBootstrapper_Silverlight
{
    public class Bootstrapper
    {
        public void Setup()
        {
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppGUI_Silverlight.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppFramework.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppResources.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(MyAppAdditionalResources_Android.AssemblyReference.Get);
            FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read(BaseFrameworkGraphingModule.AssemblyReference.Get);
        }
    }
}

So for each application built on top of the base framework, a bootstrapper is created that indicates which assemblies to include (and some other irrelevant wiring work). To answer the question specifically, the project has compile-time references to each assembly needed (this pulls double duty as it ensures that all DLLs are packaged together for Android/Silverlight deployment) as they are not dynamically downloaded to the user's smartphone or Silverlight app but packaged in the initial download. Your question as to how the Bootstrappers know which assemblies to use, well the developer knows and places necessary FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read calls. I hope this helps! Thanks for taking the time to look at it. I have a feeling I'm making too much out of nothing (or missing a far better solution/design altogether).

Finally, I neglected (stupidly) to mention that we also compile against Mono for Android, and in the near future, WPF. WinRT is a likely addition in the future but I'll be happy to cross that bridge when we come to it. Generally though, since each is compiled in their own way with their own platform features, I don't mind terribly if different platforms have a different way of pulling in the assembly references; though it would be nice if there was a unified syntax between the platforms.

EDITx3: Yeah, another one. I mentioned, but didn't clarify with an example that not all projects need or should be read by the base framework. For example, utility or business logic projects that have code that isn't relevant to the base framework but relevant to the client application. So from the above example:

Solution
    ->MyAppBootstrapper_Android
        ->MyAppGUI_Android
        ->MyAppFramework
        ->MyAppResources
        ->MyAppAdditionalResources_Android
        ->MyCompanySharedUtilities

    ->MyAppBootstrapper_Silverlight
        ->MyAppGUI_Silverlight
        ->MyAppFramework
        ->MyAppResources
        ->MyAppAdditionalResources_Silverlight
        ->BaseFrameworkGraphingModule
        ->MyCompanySharedUtilities

MyCompanySharedUtilities could be leveraged by the MyAppGUI_Silverlight, and MyAppFramework but the developer might not run it through FrameworkAssemblyReader.Read because it only contains, say, proprietary implementations of some math, or business rules.

share|improve this question
2  
So do you always have compile-time references from some assembly (or assemblies) to all the relevant assemblies? How do the bootstrappers know which assemblies they want to use? –  Jon Skeet Jul 3 '12 at 6:20
    
Thanks for the question @JonSkeet, I've added some additional information. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 3 '12 at 12:33
    
50 reputation points seems a unfair for the length of this question ;o) –  Neil Knight Jul 3 '12 at 13:37
1  
Interesting. Your "solution" looks fine to me. If you like, you could use Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly() instead of typeof(AssemblyReference).Assembly inside your AssemblyReference class. You could also change the property to a readonly field if you want the System.Reflection.Assembly object to be created just once. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 3 '12 at 20:56
1  
Thanks for the suggestion @JeppeStigNielsen. The readonly field with GetExecutingAssembly simplifies it a bit. I'll definitely switch to the GetExecutingAssembly method instead of typeof(AssemblyReference).Assembly. Still essentially duplicating the classes throughout each assembly, but it's a bit nicer. Thanks. If nothing comes up at the end of the open bounties, if you make it an answer I mark it. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 3 '12 at 21:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

I'm not exactly sure how you expect your clients to use this code, so this suggestion may be irrelevant, but wouldn't it make more sense to do away with the Setup function (at least, hide it from the client) and use some kind of configuration file?

<ReferencedAssemblies>
    <ReferencedAssembly key="UnchangingKey" qualifiedName="SomeAssemblyName, version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=0123456789abcdef" />
</ReferencedAssemblies>

Load the assemblies from the config file. Using a key, you don't have to update the application if the fully qualified name changes, just update the config file (and leave the key as-is).

This is, basically, the approach Visual Studio uses with its project files. Here's an example from one of my VB projects:

<ItemGroup>
  <Reference Include="System.Core">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.5</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="System.Drawing" />
  <Reference Include="System.Windows.Forms" />
  <Reference Include="System.Xml.Linq">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.5</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="System.Data.DataSetExtensions">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.5</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="UIAutomationProvider">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.0</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="WindowsBase">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.0</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="PresentationCore">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.0</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="PresentationFramework">
    <RequiredTargetFramework>3.0</RequiredTargetFramework>
  </Reference>
  <Reference Include="System" />
  <Reference Include="System.Data" />
  <Reference Include="System.Xml" />
</ItemGroup>

EDIT:

Here's a thought... what if you used Reflection.Emit to generate an assembly from the XML config file? You could add a stub class to the generated assembly which your core project could use to create a hard reference to the generated assembly, and you could use Reflection to probe each reference assembly (in the XML file) to create a hard reference to any object in the referenced assemblies. You'd need to regenerate the assembly when one of the referenced assemblies changes, but it would require no code changes. You could even build the assembly generation code into your core project so that users would be able to update their projects as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Using XML as a resource could work, but in my experience in the past, it's only ever lead to headaches. Furthermore, certainly in our Silverlight builds, it means that bootstrapper no longer has a strongly tied reference to the projects/assemblies. Visual Studio reports them as "unused references" and you can build the project without including them. But then the deployed XAP file no longer has the DLLs included which will naturally fail when trying to look them up by their full name. With the strong in-code references, everything is solid at compile-time with no runtime surprises. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 3 '12 at 14:59
    
(cont.) I might resign to the fact that using an embedded config/xml to list which assemblies to include might be the generally accepted right way to go, but with our current processes and platforms it might be more pain than what it's worth. (which may indicate a problem elsewhere) Regardless, I'll give the answer a +1 and at consider a good way to feasibly incorporate it. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 3 '12 at 15:01
    
One of the downsides of creating dynamic applications is that, be definition, your tools will not be able to support it properly. Whether you are dynamically loading an object using reflection (lack of strong typing) or dynamically loading an assembly (lack of strong references), you will have to do a lot of the groundwork yourself. I am not aware of any way around this requirement. Sorry. –  JDB Jul 3 '12 at 15:37
    
Yeah, so right now we kinda have the best (worst?) of both worlds where clients or us internally have Visual Studio solutions built against our framework assemblies. So consumers of the framework have strong references where ever they're used. If a client wants to retrieve assembly references via XML, or downloaded, I guess that's their option. Internally, we're using the AssemblyReference class I posted, but we need to copy/duplicate it in each assembly we want to use. I was just hoping there'd be a nice code-equivalent/trickery like typeof but for assemblies. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 3 '12 at 15:46
    
@ChrisSinclair - updated my post. –  JDB Jul 6 '12 at 12:54

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