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Given a really oversimplified example:

Class A {
    B b = new B();
}

Class B {
    //unicorns and what-not
    //Something happens and I want to let A know
    //Yet I don't want to return and exit
}   

Is there any way that B can communicate with A without Sockets? By communicate, I mean B sending values to A without A invoking a method on B.

EDIT: Thank you for your responses. This following is my follow up question:

If I had the following, and method signal() is called simultaneously by 2 instances of B, this will cause a conflict of every B calling action twice. What can I do to solve it?

//Modified from Jon Skeet
public class A {
    private B b[];

    public A() {
        //for loop
        b[i] = new B(this);
    }

    public void signal() {
        //for loop
        b[i].action();
    }
}

public class B {
    A creator;

    public B(A creator) {
        this.creator = creator;
    }

    public void action() {
        //stuff
    }

    public void main(String[] args) {

        while(true)
            if(something==true) {
                creator.signal();
            }

   }
}
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Why don't you pass a reference of A to the constructor of B and operate on this reference? –  Nico Schertler Jun 26 '12 at 18:58
2  
What you are asking for is a straightforward example of the Observer pattern. Even though people have already given good answers, there may be educational value in knowing that. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 26 '12 at 19:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Give them both access to the same Queue. One puts elements onto it, the other pulls elements from it. If they're in separate threads, one of the BlockingQueue implementations should do the trick.

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+1. Message passing is the cleanest way to do this and it also generalizes into other solutions (multiple producers or consumers, etc.) –  Platinum Azure Jun 26 '12 at 19:00

You'd have to pass this into the constructor for B:

public class A {
    private B b;

    public A() {
        b = new B(this);
    }
}

public class B {
    A creator;

    public B(A creator) {
        this.creator = creator;
    }
}

Admittedly it's generally not a great idea to let this "escape` in the constructor, but every so often it's cleaner than the alternatives.

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4  
If you do this, just make sure you understand the concurrency implications. For instance, B.creator is not guaranteed to see any of A's fields that were assigned in the constructor -- not even the final ones. You could have a field in A, private final String name = "Foo";, and if one of B's methods ever calls creator.getName(), it might see null. It probably won't, but the JVM would be within its right, according to the JLS. –  yshavit Jun 26 '12 at 19:05
    
@yshavit: Good point - although it is guaranteed to see the new fields within the same thread, of course. Sanity still remains in the single thread case, fortunately. –  Jon Skeet Jun 26 '12 at 19:07
    
the day Java introduces within-thread race conditions, I'll move to Scala on account of it being the simpler language. ;-) –  yshavit Jun 26 '12 at 19:14
    
@JonSkeet I posted a follow up question. Would you please help me again? –  drum Jun 26 '12 at 19:39
    
@drum: It would help if you'd post valid code. Currently you've got an if statement in the middle of a class (not in a method) for example. A short but complete program demonstrating the problem would help - and it would probably be better off in a separate question. –  Jon Skeet Jun 26 '12 at 19:43

// unicorns and what-not

If A passes B an instance of itself in the constructor, you ain't need no stinkin unicorns:

class B {
    A instantiator;
    public B(A inst) { instantiator = inst; }
}


class A {
    B b = new B(this);
}

EDIT (to answer the follow-up question)

If you would like to make sure that multiple invocations of signal do not modify the the state of A concurrently, you should protect its critical sections by using synchronized keyword. If the entire method represents a single critical section, you can add synchronized to method's declaration, like this:

public synchronized void signal() {
    //for loop
    b[i].action();
}
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Class A {
    B b = new B(this);

    public void MyCallback(Object o) {

        //Whatever
    }
}

Class B {
    //unicorns and what-not

    private A a;

    // .... assign a in constructor ...

    // wherever 
    a.MyCallback(MyUnicorn);
}
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