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Is Chrome's JavaScript console lazy about evaluating arrays?

I have the following snippets in javascript whose output makes me feel that something is going wrong.

1.

a=2;
console.log(a);
a+=2;
console.log(a);

Output:2 4 ; as expected

2.

t=[0,2];
console.log(t);
t[0]+=2;
console.log(t);

Output: [2,2] [2,2]

Shouldn't the output be [0,2] [2,2] ? And whats the difference between the above two cases that results in the different answers in both the cases?

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Oct 9 '12 at 12:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I got your expected output in the latest version of Chrome. –  seth flowers Jun 26 '12 at 19:20
    
I got the expected output in firefox. –  bjelli Jun 26 '12 at 19:22
    
yep, in latest version of chrome –  gopi1410 Jun 26 '12 at 19:23
    
is this a dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/4057440/… –  antony.trupe Oct 9 '12 at 4:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's because the log is delayed until Chrome has time to do it (i.e. your scripts releases the CPU).

Try this to understand what happens :

var t=[0,2];
console.log(t);
setTimeout(function() {
     t[0]+=2;
   console.log(t);
}, 1000);

It outputs what you expect.

Is that a bug of Chrome ? Maybe a side effect of an optimization. At least it's a dangerous design...

Why is there a difference ? I suppose Chrome stores temporarily what it must log, as a primary (immutable) value in the first case, as a pointer to the array in the last case.

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3  
yeah, veryyy often they are playing with fire –  Sebas Jun 26 '12 at 19:23
    
yep, chrome seems to be doing lots of changes these days.. thanks btw :) –  gopi1410 Jun 26 '12 at 19:31

console.log in chrome/ff is asynchronous and objects that are logged are interpreted at the time when they're expanded. . Instead make a copy of the object if you want to see its value at that time (for an array):

t=[0,2];
console.log(t.slice(0));
t[0]+=2;
console.log(t);

With an array, calling .slice will duplicate the array and not create a reference. I wouldn't suggest using a time out: this really doesn't solve the problem, just circumvents it temporarily.

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Everything you're doing is right, but chrome's logging is screwy/delayed. Try making a copy of the variable and adding to that and you'll see that your code is correct.

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Chrome's logging is delayed in the newer versions, no problem from your end. Make a copy of the variable or use setTimeout.

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