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I am creating a database for my company that will store many different types of information. The categories are Brightness, Contrast, Chromaticity, ect. Each category has a number of data points which my company would like to start storing.

Normally, I would create a table for each category which would store the corresponding data. (This is how I learned to do it). However, Sometimes these categories have "sub-data" which would change the number of fields required in each table.

My question is then how do people handle the inconsistency of data when structuring their databases? Do they just keep adding more tables for extra data or is it something else altogether?

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Have you considered a NoSQL solution? –  Matthew Flynn Jun 26 '12 at 21:29
    
The best way of course would be to plan ahead and learn exactly what your requirements are. Aside from that, sure, adding tables or columns is one way to go about it. –  Jason Jun 26 '12 at 21:34
    
what's wrong? Just add the fields –  Sebas Jun 26 '12 at 21:39
    
No, I have never heard of NoSQL. Ill look into it. Thanks –  Matt Hintzke Jun 26 '12 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few (and thank goodness only a few) unbendable rules about relational database models. One of those is, that if you don't know what to store, you have a hard time storing it. Chances are, you'll have an even harder time retrieving it.

That said, the reality of business rules is often less clear cut than the ivory tower of database design. Most importantly, you might want or even need a way to introduce a new property without changing the schema.

Here are two feasable ways to go at this:

  1. Use a datastore, that specializes in loose or inexistant schemas (NoSQL and friends). Explaining this in detail is a subject of a CS Thesis, not a stackoverflow answer.
  2. My recommendation: Use a separate properties table - here is how this goes:

Assuming for the sake of argument, your products allways have (unique string) name, (integer) id, brightness, contrast, chromaticity plus sometimes (integer) foo and (string) bar, consider these tables

CREATE TABLE products (
  id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  brightness INT,
  contrast INT,
  chromaticity INT,
  UNIQUE INDEX(name)
);

CREATE TABLE properties (
  id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  proptype ENUM('null','int','string') NOT NULL default 'null',
  UNIQUE INDEX(name)
);

INSERT INTO properties VALUES
  (0,'foo','int'),
  (0,'bar','string');

CREATE TABLE product_properties (
  id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  products_id INT NOT NULL,
  properties_id INT NOT NULL,
  intvalue INT NOT NULL,
  stringvalue VARCHAR(250) NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE INDEX(products_id,properties_id)
);

now your "standard" properties would be in the products table as usual, while the "optional" properties would be stored in a row of product_properties, that references the product id and property id, with the value being in intvalue or stringvalue.

Selecting products including their foo if any would look like

SELECT 
  products.*,
  product_properties.intvalue AS foo
FROM products
  LEFT JOIN product_properties 
    ON products.id=product_properties.product_id 
    AND product_properties.property_id=1

or even

SELECT 
  products.*,
  product_properties.intvalue AS foo
FROM products
  LEFT JOIN product_properties 
    ON products.id=product_properties.product_id 
  LEFT JOIN properties 
    ON product_properties.property_id=properties.id
WHERE properties.name='foo' OR properties.name IS NULL

Please understand, that this incurs a performance penalty - in fact you trade performance against flexibility: Adding another property is nothing more than INSERTing a row in properties, the schema stays the same.

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Hmm that is an interesting solution. Ive never seen anything like that before. Thanks a lot. I will give it a whirl –  Matt Hintzke Jun 26 '12 at 22:05

If you're not mysql bound then other databases have table inheritance or arrays to solve certain of those niche cases. Postgresql is a very nice database that you can use as easily and freely as mysql.

With mysql you could:

  1. change your tables, add the extra columns and allow for NULL in the subcategory data that you don't need. This way integrity can be checked since you can still put constraints on the columns. Unless you really have a lot of subcategory columns this way I'd recommend this, otherwise option 3.

  2. store subcategory data dynamically in a seperate table, that has a category_id,category_row_id,subcategory identifier(=type of subcategory) and a value column: that way you can retrieve your data by linking it via the category_id (determines table) and the category_row_id (links to PK of the original category table row). The bad thing: you can't use foreign keys or constraints properly to enforce integrity, you'd need to write hairy insert/update triggers to still have some control there which would push the burden of integrity checking and referential checking solely on the client. (in which case you'd properly be better of going NoSQL route) In short I wouldn't recommend this.

  3. You can make a seperate subcategory table per category table, columns can be fixed or variable via value column(s) + optional subcategory identifier, foreign keys can still be used, best to maintain integrity is fixed since you'll have the full range of constraints at your disposal. If you have a lot of subcategory columns that would otherwise hopefully clutter your regular subcategory table then I'd recommend using this with fixed columns. Like the previous option I'd never recommend going dynamic for anything but throwaway data.

Alternatively if your subcategory is very variable and volatile: use NoSQL with a document database such as mongodb, mind you that you can keep all your regular data in a proper RDBMS and just storeside-data in the document database though that's probably not recommended.

If your subcategory data is in a known fixed state and not prone to change I'd just add the extra columns to the specific category table. Keep in mind that the major feature of a proper DBMS is safeguarding the integrity of your data via checks and constraints, doing away with that never really is a good idea.

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