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All -- I have these two methods in one of my classes:

public static void DeSerializeFromXml(out cDBData db, string pathToXML)
{
    using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
    {
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(cDBData));
        db = (cDBData)ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }
}

public static void DeSerializeFromXml(out cDatabases db, string pathToXML)
{
    using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
    {
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(cDatabases));
        db = (cDatabases)ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }
}

and they work fine but I was wondering why can't I create an method overload based upon the return type of the method. I thought I read that this was possible somewhere but I am obviously wrong because it doesn't work:

public static cDBData DeSerializeFromXml(string pathToXML)
{
    cDBData db;

    using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
    {
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(cDBData));
        db = (cDBData)ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }
    return db;
}

public static cDatabases DeSerializeFromXml(string pathToXML)
{
    cDatabases db;

    using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
    {
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(cDatabases));
        db = (cDatabases)ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }
    return db;
}

Thanks for your thoughtful responses

Thanks to dlev, here are the final solutions

    public static T DeSerializeFromXml<T>(string pathToXML)
    {
        T db;

        using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
        {
            XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            db = (T)ser.Deserialize(reader);
        }
        return db;
    }

    public static void SerializeToXml<T>(T db, string pathToXML)
    {
        using (var fileStream = new FileStream(pathToXML, FileMode.Create))
        {
            var ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            ser.Serialize(fileStream, db);
        }
    }

I wanted to get these posted before the Search Police close down this question.

share|improve this question
1  
How would the compiler know which one you were trying to call? No, it isn't possible to differ only by return types. –  test Jun 26 '12 at 21:40
    
See this: stackoverflow.com/questions/937928/… - some useful info (pretty much a dupe) –  Charleh Jun 26 '12 at 21:41
1  
here be dragons! –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 21:45
1  
@Hans Passant Covariant return type is not the same as overloading return type. –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 21:49
1  
C++ does not support in ether, but here is how to do it in C++ stackoverflow.com/questions/226144/… –  richard Jun 26 '12 at 22:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't do that because C# simply does not support that kind of overloading. You can achieve a similar effect by making the method generic, and returning the the generic parameter type:

public static T DeSerializeFromXml<T>(string pathToXML)
{
    T db;

    using (XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(pathToXML))
    {
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        db = (T)ser.Deserialize(reader);
    }
    return db;
}

You can then call the functions like so:

DeSerializeFromXml<cDatabases>(pathToXml);

While that's not quite what you wanted, it does have the benefit of only requiring a single method.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best way to go for this type of functionality - you can also constrain T and do some really powerful stuff with generics, like constraining to 'new' etc. I created a base mapper class using the AutoMapper lib which provided default DTO mapping for all my objects using generics –  Charleh Jun 26 '12 at 21:43
    
You sir are a genius! Thank you for you simple solution. –  Mark Kram Jun 26 '12 at 21:46

I was wondering why can't I create an method overload based upon the return type of the method.

It's simply not possible. The return type isn't taken into consideration during overload resolution, and the language just prohibits trying to overload like this. From section 3.6 of the C# 4 spec:

The signature of a method consists of the name of the method, the number of type parameters and the type and kind (value, reference, or output) of each of its formal parameters, considered in the order left to right. For these purposes, any type parameter of the method that occurs in the type of a formal parameter is identified not by its name, but by its ordinal position in the type argument list of the method. The signature of a method specifically does not include the return type, the params modifier that may be specified for the right-most parameter, nor the optional type parameter constraints.

Note that the return type is not included here. Then we have:

Signatures are the enabling mechanism for overloading of members in classes, structs, and interfaces:

  • Overloading of methods permits a class, struct, or interface to declare multiple methods with the same name, provided their signatures are unique within that class, struct, or interface.

In terms of the motivation for this, it would make life very complicated if the type of an expression depended on how the expression was used. This is the case for some expressions (e.g. null and lambda expressions) but not for method invocations and the like. You could end up with some very weird situations:

public void Foo(int x) {}
public void Foo(long y) {}

public int Bar() {}
public long Bar() {}

Foo(Bar()); // What would this call?
share|improve this answer
    
It is, as you say, a property of C#. I recall from Don Box's book on the CLR — sure you know it, Jon :) — that the CLR does technically support this kind of overloading, but it's not implemented in any languages that I know of. –  harpo Jun 26 '12 at 21:46

Why don't you just return a generic object? You probably won't need to overload in that case.

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