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I've read through many related threads but none of them seem to provide a solution.

What I'm trying to do is handle the scrollbar intelligently in my Backbone.js app. Like many others, I have multiple #mypage hash routes. Some of these routes are hierarchical. e.g. I have a #list page that lists some items, I click on an item in the list. Then it opens up a #view/ITEMID page.

My pages all share the same Content div in the HTML layout. On a navigation change, I inject a new div representing the view for that route into the Content div, replacing whatever was there before.

So now my problem:

If the item is far down in the list I might have to scroll to get there. When I click on it, the "default" Backbone behavior is that the #view/ITEMID page is displayed at the same scroll position that the #list view was. Fixing that is easy enough; just add a $(document).scrollTop(0) whenever a new view is injected.

The problem is if I hit the back button I would like to go back to the #list view at the scroll position it was previously.

I tried to take the obvious solution to this. Storing a map of routes to scroll positions in memory. I write to this map at the beginning of the handler for the hashchange event, but before the new view is actually put into the DOM. I read from the map at the end of the hashchange handler, after the new view is in the DOM.

What I'm noticing is that something, somewhere, in Firefox at least, is scrolling the page as part of a hashchange event, so that by the time my write-to-map code gets called, the document has a wonky scroll position that was definitely not explicitly made by the user.

Anyone know how to fix this, or a best practice that I should be using instead?

I double checked and there are no anchor tags in my DOM that match the hashes I'm using.

share|improve this question
    
You're not by chance using position().top and have parent elements that gain position:anything after DOM load are you? – Ohgodwhy Jun 30 '12 at 4:25
    
no, i was using $(document).scrollTop() for both reading and writing the scroll position – Mirage114 Jul 1 '12 at 17:22
up vote 13 down vote accepted

My solution to this ended up being something less automatic than I wanted, but at least it's consistent.

This was my code for saving and restoring. This code was pretty much carried from my attempt over to my actual solution, just called it on different events. "soft" is a flag that this came from a browser action (back, forward, or hash click) as opposed to a "hard" call to Router.navigate(). During a navigate() call I wanted to just scroll to the top.

restoreScrollPosition: function(route, soft) {
    var pos = 0;
    if (soft) {
        if (this.routesToScrollPositions[route]) {
            pos = this.routesToScrollPositions[route];
        }
    }
    else {
        delete this.routesToScrollPositions[route];
    }
    $(window).scrollTop(pos);
},

saveScrollPosition: function(route) {
    var pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    this.routesToScrollPositions[route] = pos;
}

I also modified Backbone.History so that we can tell the difference between reacting to a "soft" history change (which calls checkUrl) versus programmatically triggering a "hard" history change. It passes this flag to the Router callback.

_.extend(Backbone.History.prototype, {

    // react to a back/forward button, or an href click.  a "soft" route
   checkUrl: function(e) {
        var current = this.getFragment();
        if (current == this.fragment && this.iframe)
            current = this.getFragment(this.getHash(this.iframe));
        if (current == this.fragment) return false;
        if (this.iframe) this.navigate(current);
        // CHANGE: tell loadUrl this is a soft route
        this.loadUrl(undefined, true) || this.loadUrl(this.getHash(), true);
    },

    // this is called in the whether a soft route or a hard Router.navigate call
    loadUrl: function(fragmentOverride, soft) {
        var fragment = this.fragment = this.getFragment(fragmentOverride);
        var matched = _.any(this.handlers, function(handler) {
            if (handler.route.test(fragment)) {
                // CHANGE: tell Router if this was a soft route
                handler.callback(fragment, soft);
                return true;
            }
        });
        return matched;
    },
});

Originally I was trying to do the scroll saving and restoring entirely during the hashchange handler. More specifically, within Router's callback wrapper, the anonymous function that invokes your actual route handler.

route: function(route, name, callback) {
    Backbone.history || (Backbone.history = new Backbone.History);
    if (!_.isRegExp(route)) route = this._routeToRegExp(route);
    if (!callback) callback = this[name];
    Backbone.history.route(route, _.bind(function(fragment, soft) {

        // CHANGE: save scroll position of old route prior to invoking callback
        // & changing DOM
        displayManager.saveScrollPosition(foo.lastRoute);

        var args = this._extractParameters(route, fragment);
        callback && callback.apply(this, args);
        this.trigger.apply(this, ['route:' + name].concat(args));

        // CHANGE: restore scroll position of current route after DOM was changed
        // in callback
        displayManager.restoreScrollPosition(fragment, soft);
        foo.lastRoute = fragment;

        Backbone.history.trigger('route', this, name, args);
    }, this));
    return this;
},

I wanted to handle things this way because it allows saving in all cases, whether an href click, back button, forward button, or navigate() call.

The browser has a "feature" that tries to remember your scroll on a hashchange, and move to it when going back to a hash. Normally this would have been great, and would save me all the trouble of implementing it myself. The problem is my app, like many, changes the height of the DOM from page to page.

For example, I'm on a tall #list view and have scrolled to the bottom, then click an item and go to a short #detail view that has no scrollbar at all. When I press the Back button, the browser will try to scroll me to the last position I was for the #list view. But the document isn't that tall yet, so it is unable to do so. By the time my route for #list gets called and I re-show the list, the scroll position is lost.

So, couldn't use the browser's built-in scroll memory. Unless I made the document a fixed height or did some DOM trickery, which I didn't want to do.

Moreover that built-in scroll behavior messes up the above attempt, because the call to saveScrollPosition is made too late--the browser has already changed the scroll position by then.

The solution to this, which should have been obvious, was calling saveScrollPosition from Router.navigate() instead of the route callback wrapper. This guarantees that I'm saving the scroll position before the browser does anything on hashchange.

route: function(route, name, callback) {
    Backbone.history || (Backbone.history = new Backbone.History);
    if (!_.isRegExp(route)) route = this._routeToRegExp(route);
    if (!callback) callback = this[name];
    Backbone.history.route(route, _.bind(function(fragment, soft) {

        // CHANGE: don't saveScrollPosition at this point, it's too late.

        var args = this._extractParameters(route, fragment);
        callback && callback.apply(this, args);
        this.trigger.apply(this, ['route:' + name].concat(args));

        // CHANGE: restore scroll position of current route after DOM was changed
        // in callback
        displayManager.restoreScrollPosition(fragment, soft);
        foo.lastRoute = fragment;

        Backbone.history.trigger('route', this, name, args);
    }, this));
    return this;
},

navigate: function(route, options) {
    // CHANGE: save scroll position prior to triggering hash change
    nationalcity.displayManager.saveScrollPosition(foo.lastRoute);
    Backbone.Router.prototype.navigate.call(this, route, options);
},

Unfortunately it also means I always have to explicitly call navigate() if I'm interested in saving scroll position, as opposed to just using href="#myhash" in my templates.

Oh well. It works. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Just want to give credit that most of the overriding code above was taken from the original Backbone code, because I needed to make small tweaks to that existing code that couldn't be done in a more OOP-ish way. – Mirage114 Jul 1 '12 at 18:06

A simple solution: Store the position of the list view on every scroll event in a variable:

var pos;
$(window).scroll(function() {
    pos = window.pageYOffset;
});

When returning from the item view, scroll the list view to the stored position:

window.scrollTo(0, pos);
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this works, and reminds me we can just attach a scrollTo to any onShow event (via Marionette) to manually ensure one's at the top of the page. – MBHNYC Jun 4 '13 at 19:52

I have a slightly poor-man's fix for this. In my app, I had a similar problem. I solved it by putting the list view and the item view into a container with:

height: 100%

Then I set both the list view and the item view to have:

overflow-y: auto
height: 100%

Then when I click on an item, I hide the list and show the item view. This way when I close the item and go back to the list, I keep my place in the list. It works with the back button once, although obviously it doesn't keep your history, so multiple back button clicks won't get you where you need to be. Still, a solution with no JS, so if it's good enough...

share|improve this answer

@Mirage114 Thanks for posting your solution. It works like a charm. Just a minor thing, it assumes the route functions are synchronous. If there is an async operation, for example fetching remote data before rendering a view, then window is scrolled before the view content is added to the DOM. In my case, I cache data when a route is visited for the first time. This is so that when a user hits browser back/forward button, the async operation of fetching data is avoided. However it might not always be possible to cache every data you need for a route.

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