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I'm trying to extract the class type from a pointer passed into a macro. Here's what i have so far

template <class CLASS> class getter
{
public:
    typedef CLASS type;
};
template <class CLASS> getter<CLASS> func(const CLASS* const)
{
    return getter<CLASS>();
}
...
#define GETTYPE(PTR) func(p)::type
...
MyClass *p = new MyClass;
...
GETTYPE(p) myClass;

Is this even possible? Am I barking up the wrong tree?

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So basically what you want is to strip the pointer in the template? –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 26 '12 at 21:49
1  
std::remove_pointer<>::type? –  ildjarn Jun 26 '12 at 21:50
    
Yes but given a pointer, not a pointer type –  cppguy Jun 26 '12 at 21:50
1  
@cppguy: At that point, you surely know a name for the type. C++ is statically typed, so you cannot have a variable of a type that is not known to the compiler... you just need to use whatever the alias for the name is in the context of the variable. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 26 '12 at 21:55
1  
There is an answer: BOOST_TYPEOF + boost::remove_pointer<>. Downvoted because we had to prod every relevant piece of information out of you instead of just volunteering it initially (not to mention the whole X=Y thing...). –  ildjarn Jun 26 '12 at 22:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use decltype in C++11.

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using visual studio 2005... no decltype unfortunately. That's what I'm trying to reproduce –  cppguy Jun 26 '12 at 22:02

Yes and no. You can extract from a generic type that you know it is a template what is the pointed type. But you cannot do it with a function. A simple implementation is std::remove_pointer in C++11, that is implemented in the lines of:

template <typename T>
struct remove_ptr {       // Non pointer generic implementation
   typedef T type;
};
template <typename T>
struct remove_ptr<T*> {   // Ptr specialization:
   typedef T type;
};

Use:

template <typename T> void foo( T x ) {
   typedef typename remove_ptr<T>::type underlying_type;
}
int main() {
   foo( (int*)0 ); // underlying_type inside foo is int
   foo( 0 );       // underlying_type inside foo is also int
}
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Unfortunately, that's not what I need. I need access to the type at the same level that the pointer exists like in my example above –  cppguy Jun 26 '12 at 21:56
1  
@cppguy: C++ is a strong and statically typed language. At the place where the variable is in scope you have the type of the variable. You don't need to access it through the pointer since you know the type. Do you care to explain how can you not have the type? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 26 '12 at 21:58
    
I have updated the example above to show how I mean to use this code David. At the time the macro is called, I do not know the pointer type –  cppguy Jun 26 '12 at 22:01
    
@cppguy: You are not showing why you need the macro, what do you intend on doing with it –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 26 '12 at 22:05
2  
template <typename T> int (T::*somFuncPtr( T* p )) { return &T::someFuncName; } (assuming that the member pointer is to an int data member, you can change the code for any other type including functions –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 26 '12 at 22:13

I think you are barking up the wrong tree. If you have a variable you know it's type through either a template parameter or declaration. If the type is explicit in the declaration you already have it so there's no need to ask the compiler. If you are looking for consistency try a typedef at the beginning of the function block. If the type is from a template parameter use the suggestion David provided to remove the pointer and reference modifiers.

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