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The majority of my code for accessing a Stored Procedure dataset (MS SQL Server, forward-only, readonly) is a fallback to my Clipper coding from many years ago

In code review today, I noticed a reference to IsEmpty instead in a similar block of code. Is this just a preference or is there any real difference in the example scenario?

MyStoredProc.Open;
if not MyStoredProc.IsEmpty then
begin
  DoSomething;
end;

Where I usually use

MyStoredProc.Open;
if not MyStoredProc.Eof then
begin
  DoSomething;
end;

Mostly because it mirrors the practice of what I use in a while loop when it's more than one record:

MyStoredProc.Open;
while not MyStoredProc.Eof then
begin
  DoSomething;
  MyStoredProc.Next;
end;
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The IsEmpty property is for check if the dataset has records, and Eof is for check if the current record is the last. In your case if you need iterate over a dataset use eof to determine if you reach the last record.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I added some clarification. The IsEmpty reference is not used in a loop as my original example. – Darian Miller Jun 26 '12 at 22:05
1  
Well my answer explain that too, if you want check if a dataset has records use IsEmpty, The Eof will return true for a empty dataset too, but the prefered way is use IsEmpty. – RRUZ Jun 26 '12 at 22:09
    
Is there a reason for IsEmpty over EOF? Why is it 'preferred'? – Darian Miller Jun 26 '12 at 22:15
4  
IsEmpty Is preferred because this is the aim of this property (test if a dataset has record) and keep your code more clean, because is much more clear write If not Dataset.IsEmpty then doSomething; than If not Dataset.Eof then doSomething; – RRUZ Jun 26 '12 at 22:19
    
Just a nuance, but EOF doesn't exactly indicate that the current record is the last. It indicates that the dataset cursor has moved beyond the last record. That's why IsEmpty is the same as BOF and EOF (we are before the first record and after the last record at the same time so there are no records). msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… – Tony Mar 4 '14 at 18:38

IsEmpty is equivalent to Bof and Eof, not equivalent to Eof.

In this particular case, directly after opening a new dataset it is equivalent to Eof (because you know Bof also holds), but in general it is not.

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