Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an Activity that implemented View.OnKeyListener so that it could catch when the user hit the back button and would pop up a dialog. Previously, it worked just fine. Recently, however, it has stopped working and the app would just pretend that there was no onKey method to catch the Back button. I can't seem to figure out why, as I've barely touched the onKey method since I made the changes. I tried just using OnBackPressed() instead, but that didn't solve anything and in fact created weird and unpredictable behavior. Can anyone help me figure out why it seems like my app is letting the system take the reigns on the back button?

Here's the important parts of my implementation:

import com.actionbarsherlock.app.ActionBar;
import com.actionbarsherlock.app.SherlockFragmentActivity;
import com.actionbarsherlock.view.Menu;
import com.actionbarsherlock.view.MenuItem;
import com.actionbarsherlock.view.MenuInflater;
import android.app.AlertDialog;
import android.content.DialogInterface;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.content.SharedPreferences;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.preference.PreferenceManager;
import android.view.KeyEvent;
import android.view.View;

public class NagTasksAddTasksActivity extends SherlockFragmentActivity implements View.OnKeyListener {
    //various parameters
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceBundle)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceBundle);
        SharedPreferences prefs = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(getBaseContext());
        String setTheme = prefs.getString("themeselect", "Dark Overflow");
        if (setTheme.toLowerCase().contentEquals("dark overflow")){
            setTheme(R.style.Theme_Sherlock_ForceOverflow);
        } else if (setTheme.toLowerCase().contentEquals("light overflow")){
            setTheme(R.style.Theme_Sherlock_Light_ForceOverflow);
            isDarkThemeUsed = false;
        } else if (setTheme.toLowerCase().contentEquals("dark menu")){
            setTheme(R.style.Theme_Sherlock);
        } else if (setTheme.toLowerCase().contentEquals("light menu")){
            setTheme(R.style.Theme_Sherlock_Light);
            isDarkThemeUsed = false;
        }
        setContentView(R.layout.createtasklayout);
        ActionBar actionBar = getSupportActionBar();
        setTitle(R.string.newTask);

    }
    ...
    @Override
    public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
        if (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK)
        {
            AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);
            builder.setCancelable(true);
            builder.setTitle(R.string.wait);
            builder.setMessage(R.string.confirmbackkey);
            builder.setPositiveButton(R.string.save, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    //stuff
                    dialog.dismiss();
                }
            });
            builder.setNegativeButton(R.string.discard, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    AlertDialog.Builder subBuilder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getParent());
                    subBuilder.setCancelable(true);
                    subBuilder.setTitle(R.string.wait);
                    subBuilder.setMessage(R.string.confirmdiscard);
                    subBuilder.setPositiveButton(R.string.yes, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                            //more stuff
                            dialog.dismiss();
                        }
                    });
                    subBuilder.setNegativeButton(R.string.no, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                            dialog.cancel();
                        }
                    });
                    dialog.dismiss();
                    subBuilder.create().show();
                }
            });
            builder.setNeutralButton(R.string.cancel, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    dialog.cancel();
                }
            });
            builder.create().show();
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another way to catch the back button is to use the dispatchKeyEvent method in the Activity (you don't need to implement View.OnKeyListener). This seems to work for me every time.

public class HomeActivity extends Activity
{
...

    @Override
    public boolean dispatchKeyEvent(KeyEvent event) 
    {
        int action = event.getAction();
        int keyCode = event.getKeyCode();
        switch (keyCode) 
        {
            case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK:
                if (action == KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN)
                {
                    Log.v("myApp", "Back button pressed.");
                    return true;
                }
            default:
                return false;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Small question: shouldn't the return be with the case statement? Similar to how you're supposed to configure OnOptionsItemSelected()? –  MowDownJoe Jun 27 '12 at 3:54
    
Yes it definitely should be. I suppose something like this is a cleaner solution. This way I'm returning false unless the key event actually does something... –  Louis Morda Jun 27 '12 at 16:45
    
Well, this works. And it also shows that I have other bugs to find. Excuse me. –  MowDownJoe Jun 27 '12 at 22:04
    
Instead of 'return false' you probably want to do return super.dispatchKeyEvent(event); –  Carsten Dec 3 '13 at 2:39
add comment

Try removing the return true under builder.create().show(); and change the return false into return true and see if it works. this should let them all to return results when a KeyEvent is initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
...Wouldn't that intercept EVERY key press and make them do nothing? I mean, I know I'm just doing this for testing purposes, but that still sounds stupid dangerous. –  MowDownJoe Jun 26 '12 at 22:44
    
Wouldn't return true let a KeyEvent return results? –  Kurty Jun 26 '12 at 23:13
    
The documentation suggests you return true for onKey() if you have handled the KeyEvent and that the OS doesn't need to. Currently, the code is set up to return true only if the back button is pressed (at least it's supposed to) and to return false elsewise. Changing it to always return true would mean that the OS would never handle any keyEvents on that activity ever. –  MowDownJoe Jun 26 '12 at 23:24
add comment

The simplest way to do this is to override OnBackPressed and fill in the code you want to have happen when someone presses the back button.

just make sure you delete the super.OnBackPressed line.

share|improve this answer
    
Also I would set cancelable to false for your dialogs. –  droider Jun 26 '12 at 23:57
    
"I tried just using OnBackPressed() instead, but that didn't solve anything and in fact created weird and unpredictable behavior." - Quote from my question. –  MowDownJoe Jun 27 '12 at 0:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.