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First of all, I'm extremely sorry but I can't provide the source code (it's in my native language, anyway). So, what I'm doing is declaring an ifstream object in a (global) function, then send it to a member-function of a class (that gets it as a reference), then that function passes it to another member function of a class that's used within the before mentioned one (also gets it as a reference). I have pinpointed the segmentation fault at the use for reading within the member function that's within the class that's within the other class (oh my god...), i have tried eof() just to check if it gets messed by some way, it returns 0 (as expected) without crashing, it only crashes when I try to get some data as input through the ifstream object.

Sorry for the recursive description / not providing the source code, if you want to help and have any questions, please ask and I will reply promptly.

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closed as not a real question by Maarten Bodewes, arrowdodger, Ed Heal, Mark, Harald Scheirich Jan 1 '13 at 12:47

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Yes, I forgot to mention, sorry, I have it like this (in the member function of the "parent" class) : ifstream_obj>>integer>>string; call_to_member_function_of_child_class(same_ifstream_obj); –  Patrunjel Jun 26 '12 at 22:56

1 Answer 1

First of all, I'm extremely sorry but I can't provide the source code (it's in my native language, anyway). So, what I'm doing is declaring an ifstream object in a (global) function, then send it to a member-function of a class (that gets it as a reference), then that function passes it to another member function of a class that's used within the before mentioned one (also gets it as a reference).

So, something like this:

class Foo {
public:
    // appropriate constructor here
    std::ifstream &stream;
};

Foo f;
void Func() {
    std::ifstream stream("whatever");
    f.stream = stream;
}

Yeah that's bad. Your stream is local to your global function. Once the function returns any references or pointers to it are invalid as it is stored with automatic storage duration. if you want the thing to stay alive then you will need to allocate it dynamically (probably sub-optimal) or construct it within the class itself.

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It looks similar to this : pastebin.com/szeQ4s5E (actually, that's exactly how it happens) –  Patrunjel Jun 26 '12 at 23:09
1  
@Patrunjel: I don't see a problem with that code, nor does it raise any exception when I run it. I think we need an actual code sample and sample input to reproduce the problem. –  Ed S. Jun 26 '12 at 23:17
    
This is the input: pastebin.com/niyb3aPq (the code uses two input files, but I just used this one two times, for testing purposes, and it doesn't even get to reading the second file, anyway). And this is the source code pastebin.com/Zg6eiVxR . The nasty thing happens in line 15. –  Patrunjel Jun 26 '12 at 23:24

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