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I am writing a logger for a sorting function like this:

bubble :: (Ord a) => [a] -> Writer [String] [a]
bubble (x:y:ys)  
        | x > y = do
                tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"]
                y:bubble(x:ys)
        | otherwise = do
                tell [show y ++ " is a number"] 
                x:bubble(y:ys)
bubble [x] = do 
            tell ["nothing works"]
            return [x] 

but i get this error:

 Couldn't match expected type `WriterT
                                    [String] Data.Functor.Identity.Identity [a]'
                with actual type `[a0]'
    In a stmt of a 'do' block: y : bubble (x : ys)
    In the expression:
      do { tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"];
           y : bubble (x : ys) }
    In an equation for `bubble':
        bubble (x : y : ys)
          | x > y
          = do { tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"];
                 y : bubble (x : ys) }
          | otherwise
          = do { tell [show y ++ " is a number"];
                 x : bubble (y : ys) }
Failed, modules loaded: none.

I have read this error message word for word but I am not any closer to what the problem is? I tried compiling with out the deceleration, for a fresh set of errors like this:

q.hs:21:17:
    No instance for (MonadWriter [[Char]] [])
      arising from a use of `tell'
    Possible fix:
      add an instance declaration for (MonadWriter [[Char]] [])
    In a stmt of a 'do' block:
      tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"]
    In the expression:
      do { tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"];
           y : bubble (x : ys) }
    In an equation for `bubble':
        bubble (x : y : ys)
          | x > y
          = do { tell [show x ++ " why does this not work"];
                 y : bubble (x : ys) }
          | otherwise
          = do { tell [show y ++ " is a number"];
                 x : bubble (y : ys) }
Failed, modules loaded: none.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A nod in the right direction:

  1. What is the type of y?
  2. What is the type of bubble(x:ys)?
  3. What is the type of (:)?

Answers:

(In these answers, a is the same a as in bubble :: (Ord a) => [a] -> Writer [String] [a].)

  1. y :: a
  2. bubble(x:ys) :: Writer [String] [a]
    • bubble is a function, bubble(x:ys) is the result of applying bubble to x:ys
  3. (:) :: b -> [b] -> [b]
    • : is an operator; whatever type its first operand has, its second operand must have the type "list of whatever type the first operand has", and the result has that same list type.

Given that you have given y and bubble(x:ys) as the operands to :, can you see now what the problem is?

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hmm is 1. Ord a 2. a function called with a list 3. the operand to add an element to a list? Do i need to change my declarations? –  baron aron Jun 27 '12 at 0:02
1  
No, your declaration looks good to me. Keep making more :) –  mergeconflict Jun 27 '12 at 0:12
    
@baronaron Your type declaration is fine, the problem is in the line y:bubble(x:ys). See my edit. –  dave4420 Jun 27 '12 at 0:18
    
Thank you both so much. The Stack Overflow community to the rescue yet again:) Thank you both again. –  baron aron Jun 27 '12 at 0:35

It's somewhat unfortunate, in cases like these, that Writer w a is a type synonym for WriterT w Identity a. It makes the compiler error messages (which are normally very informative) much harder to interpret. So my suggestion here is to simply ignore the content of the error message entirely and pretend you're the type checker.

@dave4420 provided a very good hint, I think. I'll add to that by saying: don't remove the type declaration for bubble - instead, go the opposite way: break bubble down into smaller helper functions, providing type declarations for each one. Then it should become much more clear where your problem lies.

My only other hint is that this is a common issue with writing monadic code: remembering which values are of monadic type, which aren't, and when to "lift."

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