Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm a beginner in Java, I used PHP, C++ and Lua and never had this problem, I made two classes just for exercising's sake Facto and MyFacto, first one does find a factorial and the second one should find factorial not by adding, but by multiplying. Don't blame me for the stupid and pointless code, I am just testing and trying to get the hang of Java.

Main:

public class HelloWorld {
public static void main(String[] args) {

    Facto fc = new Facto(5);
    fc.calc();
    System.out.println(fc.get());   

    MyFacto mfc = new MyFacto(5);
    mfc.calc();
    System.out.println(mfc.get());

}
}

Facto.java:

public class Facto {
private int i;
private int res;

public Facto(int i) {
    this.i = i;
}

public void set(int i) {
    this.i = i;
}

public int get() {
    return this.res;
}

public void calc() {
    this.res = this.run(this.i);
}

private int run(int x) {
    int temp = 0;
    if(x>0) {
        temp = x + this.run(x-1);
    }
    return temp;
}
}

MyFacto.java:

public class MyFacto extends Facto {
public MyFacto(int i) {
    super(i);
}

private int run(int x) {
    int temp = 0;
    if(x>0) {
        temp = x * this.run(x-1);
    }
    return temp;
}
}

I thought the result should be 15 and 120, but I get 15 and 15. Why is that happening? Does it have something to do with calc() method not being overriden and it uses the run() method from the Facto class? How can I fix this or what is the right way to override something like this?

share|improve this question
2  
Change private int run() to protected int run() in both classes. – Greg Kopff Jun 27 '12 at 0:50
    
@GregKopff Where exactly, in Facto class or MyFacto? I changed in both of them and the result is 15 and 0. – Sergey Telshevsky Jun 27 '12 at 0:52
1  
because 0 * anything = 0. i.e. Your override is now working correctly, work on logic. =) – Peter Wilkinson Jun 27 '12 at 0:53
    
God damn late night programming :) Thank you very much, could someone explain why does it work with protected? @GregKopff could you please post it as an answer? – Sergey Telshevsky Jun 27 '12 at 0:55
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason you're running into issues is due to member access visibility.

In a nutshell:

  • public allows any Java class to see the field/function, so long as it can be reached.
  • <package>, or no apparent modifier, allows any Java object (but not subclasses) to see the field/function, as long as they're in the same directory, or package.
  • protected allows the declared class and all other subclasses to access that field/function, as well as any class in the same directory/package.
  • private allows only the declared class to access that field/function.
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you! Somehow I overlooked I made it private, when looking in to the code I saw it was public, oh that late-night programming! Thank you for your explanation! – Sergey Telshevsky Jun 27 '12 at 1:10

To expand on what @Makoto said, you're running into an issue because the calc() method of Facto does not have access to the run() method of MyFacto, so it's using it's own run() method. Changing them both to protected instead of private should do the trick.

Also, something you should probably learn to use is the @Override annotation. It's good practice to put it above any method that you are overriding. That way, if you misspell something, or the parameters don't match, you will get a warning. Also, it makes it clear to you and/or the reader. For example:

MyFacto.java#run:

@Override
protected int run(int x) {
    int temp = 0;
    if(x>0) {
        temp = x * this.run(x-1);
    }
    return temp;
}

Good luck with Java!

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't realise you had worked it out when I posted, glad it's all fine now. :) – lachy2901 Jun 27 '12 at 1:11
    
Nevertheless your comment was helpful, I tried to annotate with @Override, but had an error The method run(int) of type MyFacto must override or implement a supertype method, couldn't find out what it really means so I erased it, I will use it from now on then. Is there any other reason to use @Override annotation other than readability and getting errors in the IDE? – Sergey Telshevsky Jun 27 '12 at 1:16
    
@Vlakarados: The point of @Override is to catch exactly the problem you faced - you thought you were overriding a method when you weren't. – Greg Kopff Jun 27 '12 at 1:19
    
@GregKopff Thank you! – Sergey Telshevsky Jun 27 '12 at 1:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.