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I've been trying to make a simple program that takes the user input, until they press done. And when they do the program will print out everything that they have typed. I feel I have got most of it working, and the program compiles fine but when I enter the input and then press done it will output done for as many lines as I have entered the input. Ive drawn it out, feel that this code should work. Also i'm very new to C. So if anyone can let me know whats wrong or even give me suggestions.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct llist {          
struct llist* nxt; 
char* string;
};              

void add(struct llist **tail, char* str) { 
    struct llist* n_ptr = (struct llist*)malloc(sizeof(struct llist));
    (**tail).string = str; 
    (**tail).nxt = n_ptr;   
        (*tail) = n_ptr; 
    n_ptr->nxt = (struct llist*)0;
};

void print(struct llist *Head) {
    struct llist* ptr;
    ptr = Head;
    while(ptr->nxt){ 
        printf("%s\n", ptr->string);
        fflush(stdout);
        (ptr = (ptr->nxt)); }
}

int main() {
    char* line = NULL;
    size_t size = 100; 
    char* done = "done";

    struct llist head; 
    struct llist* tail = (struct llist*)malloc(sizeof(struct llist));

    tail = &head; 

    do { 
    getline(&line, &size, stdin); 
    add( &tail , line ) ;   
    } while ( strncmp(line, done, 4) != 0 );

    print(&head);

    return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your list only contains a pointer to the data, not the data itself. So if the data added to the list changes, the data in the list changes too. For every call to add, str is the same. So you've just added the same pointer to the list over and over.

For a quick, ugly fix, change:

(**tail).string = str;

to:

(**tail).string = strdup(str);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, tried that and it worked perfectly, except from a warning from the compiler. –  Patrick Kennedy Jun 27 '12 at 1:33
1  
From a missing #include <string.h>? –  David Schwartz Jun 27 '12 at 1:50
    
Maybe, I'm pretty new so I don't know what all of these warnings mean but it says, cmdline.c:11:20: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strdup’ [enabled by default] –  Patrick Kennedy Jun 27 '12 at 1:53
    
Sounds like a missing header. –  David Schwartz Jun 27 '12 at 2:07

Some notes for you.

  • getline() takes a pointer to a buffer. The text will be stored wherever the pointer says. Where will your text go? You should either do this:

line = malloc(size);

or perhaps

char line[100];

Either of these will fix the problem. But since getline() will dynamically grow the buffer if it is not large enough, maybe the malloc() solution is preferable. (I don't know if getline() will try to call free() or not when it dynamically grows the buffer; if it does, then the malloc() one is very preferable.)

EDIT: You can ignore the above point! It turns out that getline() is smart enough that if you start out with a null pointer, it will allocate a buffer for you. So your code is correct as written. Sorry about that; I am not familiar with getline().

  • Your linked list code mostly calls malloc() to make new nodes. But for some reason you declare a single node, to be head, statically. That's okay for a little program like this one, but it will be confusing if you ever write a large program; when you go to free the linked list you would need to be careful not to free the first node (since it wasn't allocated using malloc()). Personally I would make both head and tail be pointers, and start them both set to NULL (for a length-zero linked list). The easiest way to do this would be to make your add() function take an argument for the head pointer, and make it set up head when adding the very first struct to the linked list. You would also need to be a little bit careful because when you are adding your very fist struct to the linked list, your tail isn't set yet, so you shouldn't try to link a new node onto the previous node before there is one. Thus, your first call to add() should set head and tail to point to a brand-new instance of your struct, and the new instance should have its next pointer set to null; other calls to add() should then link the new structs in to the existing linked list.

  • In real programs you would always check the return values of functions. It is possible for malloc() to fail; you shouldn't just assume it always works. But if you are doing this for a class, and you don't have to do those error checks, I guess you can skip it. It never hurts to learn careful habits early, though.

  • As noted in @David Schwartz's answer, you should call strdup() to get a copy of each string.

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I was thinking about making the head a pointer, but the example of a llist had it statically. I don't understand fully why i should call strdup() though. –  Patrick Kennedy Jun 27 '12 at 1:44
1  
Here is why you need to call strdup(): You have a buffer called line that you will pass to getline(). Each call to getline() will re-use this same buffer. The same space will be used for each new string; that means each new string will overwrite the previous string. If all you do is store the address of line in each node, then when your list prints at the end, it will just print the word done over and over (because that was the last thing typed into the line buffer). strdup() allocates enough space to store the string, copies the string into the space, and returns a pointer. –  steveha Jun 27 '12 at 1:48
    
I was mistaken in my first point and edited the text to reflect this. getline() will allocate a buffer if you start it with a null pointer so your code is fine as-is. –  steveha Jun 27 '12 at 1:52
struct llist head; 
struct llist* tail = (struct llist*)malloc(sizeof(struct llist));

tail = &head;

I'd also like to point out that the malloc here is unnecessary. You are discarding it anyway with the assignment on the third line causing a memory leak.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef enum {FAILURE, SUCCESS} ReturnType;

typedef struct node_t Node;
struct node_t {
    Node* next;
    char* data;
};

Node* nodeCreate(char* str) {
    Node* res = (Node*) malloc(sizeof(Node));
    if (res == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }

    res->data = (char*) malloc(strlen(str) + 1);
    if (res->data == NULL) {
        free(res);
        return NULL;
    }

    strcpy(res->data, str);
    res->next = NULL;

    return res;
}    

void nodeDestroy(Node* node) {
    free(node->data);
    free(node);
}    

typedef struct list_t {
    Node* head;
    Node* tail;
} List;

List* listCreate() {
    List* res = (List*) malloc(sizeof(List));
    if (res == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }

    res->head = (Node*) malloc(sizeof(Node));
    if (res->head == NULL) {
        free(res);
        return NULL;
    }
    res->head->next = NULL;
    res->head->data = NULL;
    res->tail = res->head;

    return res;
}

void listDestroy(List* list) {
    if (list == NULL) {
        return;
    }

    Node* curr = list->head;
    Node* next = NULL;

    while (curr != NULL) {
        next = curr->next;
        nodeDestroy(curr);
        curr = next;
    }
    free(list);
}

ReturnType listAdd(List* list, char* str) {
    if (list == NULL) {
        return FAILURE;
    }

    Node* newNode = nodeCreate(str);
    if (newNode == NULL) {
        return FAILURE;
    }

    list->tail->next = newNode;
    list->tail = list->tail->next;

    return SUCCESS;
};

void listPrint(List* list) {
    if (list == NULL) {
        return;
    }

    Node* curr = list->head->next;
    while(curr != NULL){
        printf("%s\n", curr->data);
        curr = curr->next;
    }
}

#define MAX_LINE_SIZE 100

int main() {
    setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0);
    char line[MAX_LINE_SIZE];
    char* done = "done";

    List* list = listCreate();
    if (list == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failure!\n");
        return 0;
    }

    do {
        scanf("%s", line);
        if (listAdd(list , line) == FAILURE) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Failure!\n");
            listDestroy(list);
            return 0;
        }
    } while (strncmp(line, done, 4) != 0);

    listPrint(list);

    listDestroy(list);

    return 0;
}
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