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JavaScript losing “this” object reference with private/public properties

Why does the second alert shows the window object, and not the O (or even P) object?

window.name = "test window";

O = {
    name : 'object O',
    f : function() {
        alert(this.name); // 2nd alert
    }
}

P = {
    name : 'object P',
    f : function() {
        alert(this); // 1st alert
        var of = O.f;
        of();
    }
}

P.f();

In other words, how can a direct call to an object's function be in the context of the window? I guess it's a question of closure, but i have no idea where the switch happens.

Thank you.

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marked as duplicate by Thilo, McGarnagle, Thomas Eding, Tina CG Hoehr, Evan Mulawski Jun 27 '12 at 3:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Because you have detached O.f from O. –  Matt Ball Jun 27 '12 at 1:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you do this:

var of = O.f;
of();

Your this gets mangled here, because this isn't really ever locked-in in JavaScript. It's very malleable and in your case you could do a few things to make it work better.

You can do any of these things to bind this properly:

var of = O.f.bind(this);
of();

or

var of = O.f
of.call(this);

or just

O.f.call(this);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for answering. Indeed there are solutions for binding a function to this, which i already use in the actual code, but my question was more of "what happens here? why does this becomes the window at this line?" –  Ninj Jun 27 '12 at 11:24

If you want to maintain scope of O then try this

window.name = "test window";

O = {
    name : 'object O',
    f : function() {
        alert(this.name); // 2nd alert
    }
}

P = {
    name : 'object P',
    f : function() {
        alert(this.name); // 1st alert
        var of = O.f;
        of(); // loses scope since this.of does not exist it calls using anonymous window scope
        of.call(O); // passes O as scope
        of.call(P); // passes P as scope

        this.of = O.f;
        this.of(); // maintains current P scope


    }
}

P.f();​

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/QVSDA/

share|improve this answer
    
Ah ok! Right, so the answer is "it's called as an anonymous function. Still, i find it really weird that a call of a function inside an object can be considered as anonymous... –  Ninj Jun 27 '12 at 11:27

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