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So, essentially I have some monadic function wrapped in a MaybeT I want to use Nothing as the terminating case for a recursion

My understanding of foldr is that if it can produce the result without consuming the entire list, it can be used on an infinite list safely i.e. foldr (&&) True $ repeat False is still able to return False.

At the moment I have:

repeaterM a f = foldr (=<<) (return a) $ repeat f

This type checks, but doesn't actually work. Could anyone explain to me why I can't use this function to repeatedly apply a function to its own result until it returns Nothing?

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Why not go a f = f a >>= \a' -> go a' f? –  is7s Jun 27 '12 at 2:29
    
Could even make it go f a = f a >>= go f to get rid of the lambda . That does seem to work and seems a bit more elegant than what I was doing. I was originally generalising this from a function that would only do the action n times, using a list, hence the fold. Still, I'd like to know why this function doesn't work . –  user1484337 Jun 27 '12 at 2:43
    
What you need is actually iterateM_ –  is7s Jun 27 '12 at 2:49
    
tl;dr Maybe's =<< is strict on its RHS so foldr (=<<) on an infinite list never terminates. –  ephemient Jun 27 '12 at 2:50

1 Answer 1

foldr            :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
foldr k z = go
          where
            go []     = z
            go (y:ys) = y `k` go ys

So

foldr (&&) True $ repeat False
   = go (repeat False) where go [] = True ; go (y:ys) = y && go ys
   = False && go (repeat False) where go [] = True ; go (y:ys) = y && go ys
   = False

as you expect.

But

foldr (=<<) (return a) $ repeat f
   = go (repeat f) where go [] = return a ; go (y:ys) = y =<< ys
   = f =<< go (repeat f) where go [] = return a ; go (y:ys) = y =<< ys
   = f =<< f =<< go (repeat f) where go [] = return a ; go (y:ys) = y =<< ys
   = f =<< f =<< f =<< go (repeat f) where go [] = return a ; go (y:ys) = y =<< ys
   ...

What you're doing here is not repeatedly applying a function to its own result until it returns Nothing.

You are building up the computation from its end: the RHS of each =<< must be computed before the LHS can be carried out. But you have an infinite list, so you never get to the start of the computation.

You might try to define

repeaterM a f = foldl (>>=) (return a) $ repeat f

instead. This won't work either (thanks is7s).

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2  
foldl never terminates on infinite lists. –  is7s Jun 27 '12 at 2:43
    
Aha, now I understand. I was confusing myself in how the computation was actually being built up. I had an inkling that it was something along these lines, but I couldn't quite work it out in my head. Thanks! –  user1484337 Jun 27 '12 at 2:56

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