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This is a question I have frequently, and finally want to hear people's opinions on their preferred style.

Is it better / preferred practice to use (for read-only purposes) the parameters or the member in a constructor? For example, in this simple vector class:

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

class SimpleDoubleVector {
private:
  double * _data;
  std::size_t _size;
public:
  SimpleDoubleVector(double * data, std::size_t size) :
  _size(size) {
    _data = new double[size];
    for (int k=0; k<size; ++k)
      _data[k] = data[k];
  }
  ~SimpleDoubleVector() {
    delete[] _data;
  }
};

Is it better to

  1. use size throughout the constructor (as shown) or
  2. first assign / initialize _size, and then use _size

Possible ramifications:

Which is more readable?

Which will give better performance (or will they both be equivalent because of copy propagation)? Intuitively, it feels like reading from the parameter will be more efficient, because it is never written to, and so will result in a simpler dependency graph.

I know this may seem pedantic, but it comes up so often, and I'd really like to dissect the best way (or at least better understand what the pros and cons are).

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3  
If I had to choose, I would pick 2., as it establishes a standard that the body is based off of the state of the object, rather than the arguments. –  chris Jun 27 '12 at 3:45
    
I would change the code to use initialization lists and do what chris said. –  Jesse Good Jun 27 '12 at 3:46
    
@JesseGood Good point, but the same question still results: after the initializer list, would you use _size or size as the loop bound? –  Oliver Jun 27 '12 at 3:50
1  
I would prefer to use _size, for one more reason than others stated: You may have one function to copy and may call that function from different constructors. That copy (i.e. delegating constructor) would/should work on _size data-member of class. –  Ajay Jun 27 '12 at 4:19
2  
As a side note, just don't use leading underscores ever: There are two many cases where it's reserved by the language. Also you forgot to implement a copy constructor. –  Mark B Jun 27 '12 at 4:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Semantically, local variables (and hence parameters) are often preferred over member variables. Take this somewhat fabricated example:

class Complex {
    float real_;
    float imag_;

public:
    Complex& operator*=(const Complex& that) {
        real_ = real_ * that.real_ - imag_ * that.imag_;
        imag_ = imag_ * that.real_ + real_ * that.imag_;
    }
};

Good at first glance, until you realize that your modification of real_ in the first line changed your value for real_ in the second line. Even if you catch that and store the original real_ in a local variable, you could be in the case of c *= c, where the left-hand side and the right-hand side of the operator are aliased, and your change of real_ in the first line unintentionally alters that.real_ in the second line. In other words, changes to member variables have the ability to cause side effects that changes to local variables don't.

Speed-wise, any reasonable compiler will find the two identical. Unreasonable compilers might produce better code if you reuse the parameter, since it's already in a local and the compiler knows for certain that nothing can change that value except the code it can see. It's also worth noting that mildly complicated cases, even on good compilers, can generate worse output for cases like this:

void MyClass::foo(int value, MyClass* child) {
    value_ = value;
    for (int i = 0; i < value_; ++i) {
        if (child) child->value_ = i;
        bar(i, child);
    }
}

This function has absolutely no way to guarantee that this and child are different pointers. So it can't keep value_ in a register between loop iterations, because the assignment to child->value_ could've changed this->value_. In this case, even good compilers will want to see you use the parameter.

Readability-wise, if you think that an underscore before or after your member name (or m_, for that matter) makes it unreadable, then why are you using that notation? Consistency between constructor bodies and normal function bodies is definitely desirable. So I would argue that if your semantics encourage pulling member variables into local variables for the duration of a function, then do that in the constructor too (just use the parameter). But if no such convention is used in your other member functions, then don't do it in the constructor either—let the compiler take care of it.

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"This function has absolutely no way to guarantee that this and child are different pointers" - this is not entirely true. If both types are polymorphic the common base address can be determined by dynamically casting to void* and comparing the results. –  Captain Obvlious Jun 27 '12 at 4:46
1  
@CaptainObvlious I'm speaking from the compiler's point of view, where a inserting a comparison or dynamic_cast just to prove that there is no aliasing might be counterproductive. Of course, I'm still being disingenuous, because it's definitely possible in this case, but it's completely unreasonable to expect the compiler to solve the aliasing problem in general. The first line of the for loop could be an arbitrary function call; this is a hugely simplified example. –  John Calsbeek Jun 27 '12 at 4:58
    
"if you think that an underscore before or after your member name (or m_, for that matter) makes it unreadable, then why are you using that notation?" I think there is some confusion: I was never asking whether I should use underscores. I am asking which is more readable because member values may change during initialization / assignment, and if they are used in an expression that assigns another variable, it may be more obfuscated. –  Oliver Jun 27 '12 at 18:17
    
@Oliver If you have two variables with identical names except that one is a local and one is a member variable, and their values differ at any point at all, I think it's less readable no matter which one you pick for your convention. –  John Calsbeek Jun 28 '12 at 4:52
    
+1 For the void MyClass::foo(int value, MyClass* child) example. –  Oliver Jul 2 '12 at 6:16

I always use the parameters (where possible) throughout constructors for two reasons:

1) I'm initializing the object state from external input. Using the parameters underscores this use of external data.

2) When using initializer lists more extensively it prevents a wide variety of problems where you use a class member before it's initialized (due to the initialization order being specified by member order, NOT the initializer order in the constructor).

I can't conceive of any performance reason that would make one measurably different from the other, so only if a profiler told me that changing it resulted in a significant improvement would I choose a different approach.

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I would make the class as follows:

class SimpleDoubleVector {
private:
  std::size_t _size; // Make sure this is declared first!!
  double * _data;
public:
  SimpleDoubleVector(double * data, std::size_t size) : 
      _size(size), data(new double[size]) // Use initialization lists
  {
    for (int k = 0; k < _size; ++k) // Could eliminate all this with std::vector
      _data[k] = data[k];
  }
  ~SimpleDoubleVector() {
    delete[] _data;
  }
};

Of course this is not all the code, since you are managing a resource, you would need to implement the rule-of-three (or 5 or something like that in C++11). However, a few pointers:

  1. When you do _size = size; in the body of the constructor, you are no longer doing initialization, you are doing assignment, that is why you should use initialization lists (of course for built-in types, this is effectively the same thing, however, I would argue the intent is different).

  2. The arguments passed to the constructor are for purposes of initializing member variables in your example. You should not use them for any other purposes other than for performing initialization.

  3. You probably would be better off using std::vector<double> or std::array<double>, but I am sure that is irrelevant to the question.

Also, I have no idea how dependency graphs are related to this question.

(Personal note: I have never liked the style prepending _ for member variables)

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The dependency graph is a digraph where arrows point to lvalues used in assignment or initialization, from any variables used in the assignment expression. The dependency graph will be have greater depth using the strategy in your answer (parameter --> member --> dependent expressions). The other (perhaps less readable) strategy will result in a different, more parallelizable graph (parameter --> member; parameter --> dependent expressions). The question links the Wikipedia page on dependency graphs for your convenience. –  Oliver Jun 27 '12 at 4:18
1  
@Oliver: It sounds like you are trying to do the compilers job. I'm sure that performance will be equivalent for most circumstances. –  Jesse Good Jun 27 '12 at 4:25

If the question is readability, the answer should be an initializer list. Since _data is listed first, the issue is kind of forced.

    SimpleDoubleVector(double * data, std::size_t size)
        : _data(std::copy(data, data+size, new double[size])),
          _size(size)
        {}

If _size was listed first, there is a choice, but I would choose to use the parameter in this case, since the source code is slightly easier to read without the _. I believe with std::copy the performance difference would be negligible.

I would use the same reasoning if initialization must occur in the body of the constructor, if the names in the parameters and data member names have a 1-1 correspondence. If a data member was initialized with some sort of computation of the parameters, then clearly the code should use the computed value if it is useful for the initialization of the other data members. If there is a complex initialization, it is often useful to place that initialization in a separate function. This anticipates multiple constructors. This function could be written to leverage initialized data members, so as to minimize the parameters passed between the constructor and the initialization function.

    SimpleDoubleVector(double * data, std::size_t size) {
        _size = size;
        initialize_data(data);
    }

    SimpleDoubleVector(std::size_t size) {
        _size = size;
        initialize_data();
    }

    double * initialize_data(double * data = 0) {
        _data = new double[_size];
        if (data) {
            for (std::size_t k = 0; k < _size; ++k) {
                _data[k] = data[k];
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I do know what you mean (as noted in comments above), but there exist cases where one liners are infeasible or inefficient, and so initializer lists are not a panacea. In those cases, should the body of the constructor use the parameter throughout, or first initialize or assign members, and subsequently use members throughout? –  Oliver Jun 27 '12 at 4:10
    
@Oliver: I didn't mean to talk around your point. I've updated my answer, thanks and regards –  jxh Jun 27 '12 at 4:16

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