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I want to consult SQL Server OR short-circuit

Code:

   DECLARE @tempTable table
      (
         id int
      )
      INSERT @tempTable(id) values(1)

      DECLARE @id varchar(10)
      SET @id = 'x'
      SELECT * FROM @tempTable WHERE 1=1 OR id = @id --successfully
      SELECT * FROM @tempTable WHERE @id = 'x' OR id = @id --Exception not Convert 'x' to int

Why? 1=1 and @id='x' is true.

SQL Server OR operator : whether the short-circuit function?

THANKS

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3  
There is no guarantee whatsoever on how and which parts of an OR condition are evaluated first (or at all). T-SQL is NOT like C# in that way. You cannot rely on boolean short-circuiting. –  marc_s Jun 27 '12 at 5:17
    
Why? 1=1 and @id='x' is true - it is or actually, not and. –  juergen d Jun 27 '12 at 5:19
    
Here, in this INSERT @tempTable(id) values(1),INTO is missing. –  vijay Jun 27 '12 at 5:37
    
OR short circuited is My doubts but my office codeing sql is((@id is NULL OR id = id) AND (@name IS NULL OR name=@name)) so I would like to know whether the short-circuit Because This decision process efficiency To do so, just reuse the query plan –  NotTwoWayStreet Jun 27 '12 at 6:22
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Within SQL, there is no requirement that an OR clause breaks early. In other words, it is up to the optimizer whether to check both conditions simutaneously. I am not an expert in the MSSQL optimizer, but I have seen instances where the optimizer has and has not short circuited an OR clause.

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OR short circuited is My doubts but my office codeing sql is((@id is NULL OR id = id) AND (@name IS NULL OR name=@name)) so I would like to know whether the short-circuit Because This decision process efficiency To do so, just reuse the query plan –  NotTwoWayStreet Jun 27 '12 at 6:18
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Just stumbled over this question, and had already found this blog-entry: http://rusanu.com/2009/09/13/on-sql-server-boolean-operator-short-circuit/

The SQL server is free to optimize a query anywhere she sees fit, so in the example given in the blog post, you cannot rely on short-circuiting.

However, a CASE is apparently documented to evaluate in the written order - check the comments of that blog post.

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