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I have the following async queue processing routing.

      var commandQueue = new BlockingCollection<MyCommand>();
      commandQueue
            .GetConsumingEnumerable()
            .ToObservable(new LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskPoolScheduler(5))
            .Subscribe(c =>
                           {
                               try
                               {
                                   ProcessCommand(c);
                               }
                               catch (Exception ex)
                               {
                                   Trace.TraceError(ex.ToString());
                               }
                           }
            );

In one specific scenario (when I'm about to get some data), I need to make sure that my commandQueue is empty before going out and getting the data. This operation is expected to happen synchronously. Basically, I want to do something like

  public void GetData()
  {
     commandQueue.WaitForEmpty(); 

     // could potentially be expressed: 
     // while (commandQueue.Count > 0) Thread.Sleep(10);

     return GoGetTheData()
  }

I realize that in an ideal scenario, all callers will "GetData" async...but sometimes it's necessary that it happen in a synchronous manner...and so I need to wait for the command queue to be empty to ensure the consistency and up-to-date-ness of my data.

I know how I can do this pretty easily with a ManualResetEvent...but I'd like to know if there's an easy way with System.Reactive/TPL.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a more difficult question than it seems at first. You want BlockingCollection (and the underlying ConcurrentQueue) for producer-consumer job semantics. But you also want to be able to observe what's happening with these collections, including waiting for the 'empty' signal.

Best bet is to take a look at JobQueue and ParallelJobQueue from here:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/rx/thread/2817c6e5-e5a4-4aac-91c1-97ba7de88ff7

Which includes an observable for WhenQueueEmpty and can control the number of simultaneously running jobs and queued jobs (jobs being synonymous in this case with your command concept).

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Could you use this?

    var dataObservable = Observable.Start(() =>
    {
        commandQueue.WaitForEmpty(); 
        return GoGetTheData();
    });
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The issue is that there is no such method as WaitForEmpty –  Jeff Jun 27 '12 at 19:36
    
@JeffN825 - What is BlockCollection then? Is it something you've defined? –  Enigmativity Jun 27 '12 at 22:49
    
sorry, not sure how that got truncated in my example. it's BlockingCollection msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267312.aspx –  Jeff Jun 27 '12 at 22:57
    
@JeffN825 - I'm not an expert on BlockingCollection but I would imagine that there are a number of built-in mechanisms for determining when the queue is empty. Just choose one for the WaitForEmpty method. Does that help? –  Enigmativity Jun 27 '12 at 23:12
    
Sort of. I can easily check if it's empty, but what's the most effective way of waiting? Something more effective than Thread.Sleep preferably. –  Jeff Jun 27 '12 at 23:24

It seems to me your requirements are to

  • Fetch data asynchronously
  • Process this data in parallel (max of 5 degrees of parallelism)
  • Repeat the process

If these are your requirements and you are not forced to use the BlockingCollection i.e. it is not an existing API, then I think you can solve this quite easily with Rx alone.

var dataRequestScheduler = new EventLoopScheduler();
var subscription = GetTheData()
    .Repeat()
    .SubscribeOn(dataRequestScheduler)
    .ObserveOn(Scheduler.TaskPool)//new LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskPoolScheduler(5)
    .Subscribe(c =>
           {
               try
               {
                   ProcessCommand(c);
               }
               catch (Exception ex)
               {
                   Trace.TraceError(ex.ToString());
               }
           }
        );

Where GetTheData method returns an IObservable

You could potentially leverage Observable.Start and Merge(5) to get your max 5 threads without the need for a custom scheduler.

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