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I have several blocks of code that follow this pattern:

// Dummy function defs.
def result(i : Int, d : Double, b : Boolean) = {
    if (b) d else i
}

def fA(s : String) = {7}
def fB(s : String, i : Int) = {1.0}
def fC(s : String, i : Int, d : Double) = {true}

// Actual code.
def test(s : String) : Double = {
    try {
        val a = fA(s) 
        try {
            val b = fB(s, a)
            try {
                val c = fC(s, a, b)
                result(a, b, c)
            } catch {
                case _ => result(a, b, false)
            }

        } catch {
            case _ => result(a, 0.0, false)
        }
    } catch {
        case _ => result(0, 0.0, false)
    }
}

Where a, b, & c are calculated in turn by the corresponding functions and then the values are passed to the result function. If at any stage an exception occurs then a default value is used in place of the remaining variables.

Is there a more idiomatic way to express this code. It reminds me of Monads in that it's a series of chained computations which bail out immediately if any computation fails.

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1  
Which functions can fail? result and/or fA .. fC? –  Nicolas Jun 27 '12 at 6:58
1  
@Nicolas I think fA, fB, and fC. They are noted as dummy functions. In reality they would possibly throw some exception. –  Brian Jun 27 '12 at 7:31
1  
Yes, should have been more clear, but as Brian says, fA, fB, & fC can throw. –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 7:35
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

These types of problems are just what Try aims to solve a bit more monadically (than nested try/catch blocks).

Try represents a computation that may either result in an exception, or return a successfully computed value. It has two subclasses for these-- Success and Failure.

Very funny that this question popped up when it did-- a few days ago, I finished up some additions and refactoring to scala.util.Try, for the 2.10 release and this SO question helps to illustrate an important use-case for a combinator that we eventually decided to include; transform.

(As of writing this, transform is currently in the nightly and will be in Scala from 2.10-M5 onward, due out today or tomorrow. More info about Try and usage examples can be found in the nightly docs)

With transform (by nesting them), this can be implemented using Trys as follows:

def test(s: String): Double = {
  Try(fA(s)).transform(
    ea => Success(result(0, 0.0, false)), a => Try(fB(s, a)).transform(
      eb => Success(result(a, 0.0, false)), b => Try(fC(s, a, b)).transform(
        ec => Success(result(a, b, false)), c => Try(result(a, b, c))
      )
    )
  ).get
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's what I was looking for. I look forward to trying it in Scala 2.10 –  jon-hanson Jul 13 '12 at 22:57
    
Can't you use Try(fA(s)).fold(_ => result(0, 0.0, false), a => ...). It seems it would spare the wrapping into Success as well as the final get. –  huynhjl Jul 14 '12 at 2:09
    
If I'm not mistaken, you can use a for comprehension on a Try, since flatMap is defined. –  Jaap Nov 27 '13 at 18:19
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I'm not sure you can use monads as at each step you have two alternatives (exception or result) and to be faithful to your original code, on exception you don't want to be calling the fB or fC functions.

I was not able to elegantly remove the duplication of default values so I left it as I think it's clearer. Here is my non-monadic version based on either.fold and control.Exception:

def test(s : String) = {
  import util.control.Exception._
  val args = 
    allCatch.either(fA(s)).fold(err => (0, 0.0, false), a => 
      allCatch.either(fB(s, a)).fold(err => (a, 0.0, false), b =>
        allCatch.either(fC(s, a, b)).fold(err => (a, b, false), c =>
          (a, b, c))))
  (result _).tupled(args)
}
share|improve this answer
    
You could declare val default = (0, 0.0, false) and then use default.copy( _1 = a) or (a, b, default._3), but I'm not sure if either solution is a real enhancement. Well, at least modifying defaults could be done at only one place. –  fanf42 Jun 27 '12 at 11:45
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I changed the example to use monads:

def fA(s: String) = Some(7)
def fB(i: Option[Int]) = Some(1.0)
def fC(d: Option[Double]) = true // might be false as well

def result(i: Int, d: Double, b: Boolean) = {
  if (b) d else i
}

def test(s: String) = result(fA(s).getOrElse(0), fB(fA(s)).getOrElse(0.0), fC(fB(fA(s))))

Note: The for-comprehension is interpreted as chained flatMap. So the type of res is Option[(Int, Double, Boolean)]. Therefore there is no need to write map or flatMap by yourself. The compiler does the work for you. :)

Edit

I edited my code to make it fit to all possibilitys. I will improve it, if I find a better way. Thank you for all your comments.

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Thank you for your correction. –  T.Grottker Jun 27 '12 at 7:27
    
That solution miss the fact that fA, fB, fC are able to throw exception in the real case, else surronding them with try/catch is of no use in the question. So that answer seems to miss the what was the user problem, which I understand as "how do I chain perhaps failing computation, given them default value in case of failure" –  fanf42 Jun 27 '12 at 7:35
    
This solution is wrong. If fA succeeds but fB fails, a should be equal to result of fA and b = 0.0 and c = false. With your code, any failure leads to result(0, 0.0, false). –  missingfaktor Jun 27 '12 at 7:39
    
This looks promising, but as others point out, it doesn't appear to handle the case where say fA succeeds, but fB fails so we call result(a, 0, false) –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 7:47
    
I appreciate your comments. Of course i know the real code might fail, but this is to handle in the function by returning None. I did not add this behaviour because I only wanted to outline, how the example might be changed to use monads. If you enter this code into the REPL, you wold see that the return types of the functions are Some[T] and not Option[T]. This was my first idea to improve the code. So please forgive me if I did not adapt all aspects of the original example. –  T.Grottker Jun 27 '12 at 7:56
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By defining those utility functions

implicit def eitherOps[E, A](v: Either[E, A]) = new {
  def map[B](f: A => B) = v match {
    case Left(e)  => Left(e)
    case Right(a) => Right(f(a))    
  }

  def flatMap[B](f: A => Either[E, B]) = v match {
    case Left(e)  => Left(e)
    case Right(a) => f(a)
  }

  def or(a: A) = v match {
    case Left(_) => Right(a)
    case x       => x          
  }
}

def secure[A, B](f: A => B) = new {
  def run(a: A): Either[Trowable, B]  = try {
    Right(f(a))
  } catch {
    case e => Left(e)
  }
}

and simplifying yours

def fA(s : String) = 7
def fB(i : Int) = 1.0
def fC(d : Double) = true

We'll have:

def test(s: String): Either[Throwable, Double] =  for {
  a <- secure(fA).run(s).or(0)
  b <- secure(fB).run(a).or(0.0)
  c <- secure(fC).run(b).or(false)
} yield result(a, b, c)

Edit

Here's an executable but sadly, more verbose code snippet

object Example {
  trait EitherOps[E, A] {
    def self: Either[E, A]

    def map[B](f: A => B) = self match {
      case Left(e)  => Left(e)
      case Right(a) => Right(f(a))    
    }

    def flatMap[B](f: A => Either[E, B]) = self match {
      case Left(e)  => Left(e)
      case Right(a) => f(a)
    }

    def or(a: A) = self match {
      case Left(_) => Right(a)
      case x       => x          
    }
  }

  trait SecuredFunction[A, B] {
    def self: A => B

    def secured(a: A): Either[Throwable, B]  = try {
      Right(self(a))
    } catch {
      case e => Left(e)
    }
  }

  implicit def eitherOps[E, A](v: Either[E, A]) = new EitherOps[E, A] {
    def self = v
  }

  implicit def opsToEither[E, A](v: EitherOps[E, A]) = v.self

  implicit def secure[A, B](f: A => B) = new SecuredFunction[A, B]{
    def self = f
  }

  def fA(s : String) = 7
  def fB(i : Int) = 1.0
  def fC(d : Double) = true

  def result(i : Int, d : Double, b : Boolean) = {
    if (b) d else i
  }

  def test(s: String): Either[Throwable, Double] =  for {
    a <- (fA _).secured(s) or 0
    b <- (fB _).secured(a) or 0.0
    c <- (fC _).secured(b) or false
  } yield result(a, b, c)
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I said in the question, the definitions provided for fA, fB & fC are just dummy defs, to allow the code to compile. Optimising them as you have done misses the point. –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 20:11
    
There is no optimization. You don't need to carry around other computed values since I provided default value if computation failed and they're in scope through the monadic computation. Unless you've already run the code, I think you missed the point of my post –  Yo Eight Jun 27 '12 at 20:37
    
Yo your post is good, (besides it doesn't compile OOTB) . We need to coomunicate the difference with this approach. The problem is indeed the sequential thinking, this is in my opinion the root of jons alidation problem. And that is what apparently got lost in all answers here. The point is jon you have to encode possible failure within the result type of your methods otherwise you won't get 'Monadic' benefits. –  AndreasScheinert Jun 28 '12 at 10:40
    
Sorry for that, I'll come up with a compilable version. I've written the code "by hand" :). –  Yo Eight Jun 28 '12 at 13:18
    
Apologies for my previous comment - for some reason I thought your solution required changes to the f[A-C] functions. –  jon-hanson Jun 29 '12 at 21:51
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You can use the catching idiom as follows:

import scala.util.control.Exception._

def test(s : String) : Double = result(
  catching(classOf[Exception]).opt( fA(s) ).getOrElse(0),
  catching(classOf[Exception]).opt( fB(s, a) ).getOrElse(0.0),
  catching(classOf[Exception]).opt( fC(s, a, b) ).getOrElse(false)
)

However, similarly to other solutions, this does make a slight executional change in that fB and fC will always be evaluated, whereas your original code only evaluates them if the prior calls succeeded.

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Nice, but I don't want to call fB etc if a prior function throws as they're costly to call. –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 7:38
2  
What's a and b? :) –  missingfaktor Jun 27 '12 at 7:40
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Tried to make it more functional. Not sure if this solution is clearer than yours, but I think it shoud fit better if you'll have more computation steps.

def result(i : Int, d : Double, b : Boolean) = {
    if (b) d else i
}

def fA(s : String) = {7}
def fB(s : String, i : Int) = {1.0}
def fC(s : String, i : Int, d : Double) = {true}

type Data = (Int, Double, Boolean)
def test(s : String) : Double = {
  val steps = Seq[Data => Data](
    {case (_, b, c) => (fA(s), b, c)},
    {case (a, _, c) => (a, fB(s, a), c)},
    {case (a, b, _) => (a, b, fC(s, a, b))}
  )
  val defaults: Either[Data, Data] = Right((0, 0.0, false))
  val resultData = steps.foldLeft { defaults } { (eith, func) =>
    eith match {
      case left: Left[_,_] => left
      case Right(data) => try {
        Right(func(data))
      } catch {
        case _ => Left(data)
      }
    }
  } fold (identity, identity)
  (result _) tupled (resultData)
}
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The previous answers seem to miss the fact that you want default result at each level. No need to be fancy with for expression here, you just need an helper function:

def optTry[T]( f: => T) : Option[T] = try { Some(f) } catch { case e:Exception => None }

OK, optTry is a bad name (I'm not good at that game), but then, you can just:

def test(s : String) : Double = {
  val a = optTry(fA(s)) getOrElse 0
  val b = optTry(fB(s,a)) getOrElse 0.0
  val c = optTry(fC(s,a,b)) getOrElse false

  result(a,b,c)
}

Notice that Scala 2.10 will have a Try data structure that basically does the same thing with a pimped Either in place of Option, see: http://www.scala-lang.org/archives/downloads/distrib/files/nightly/docs/library/index.html#scala.util.Try

Also notice that try { ... } catch { case _ => ... } is a bad idea, you certainly don't want to catch some system Exception like OutOfMemory and the like.

EDIT: also, see Scalaz Validation data structure for a world of awe for all that kind of problems. See: http://scalaz.googlecode.com/svn/continuous/latest/browse.sxr/scalaz/example/ExampleValidation.scala.html

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Unfortunately, this solution also calls all 3 functions even if one of them throws. I need to avoid doing this. –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 7:44
    
The catch all was just to keep the example code simple. –  jon-hanson Jun 27 '12 at 7:44
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