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I have to animate an element in an sync way (that is to wait until the animation (fadeIn() in this example) is completed, so I can propertly continue).

As fas as I know I have three options:

doSomething: function () {
    $('.someElement').fadeIn(function () {
        // do something else here...
    });
}

Another approach (using $.proxy() to alter the context):

doSomething: function () {
    $('.someElement').fadeIn($.proxy(function () {
        this.doSomethingElse();
    }, this));
},

doSomethingElse: function () {
    // ...
}

However, since using $.proxy() kinda "mixes" the contexts and I really don't like this (because I just don't know when it'll come back and bite my ass off), I'm sometimes using this approach:

doSomething: function () {
    $('.someElement').fadeIn(function () {
        doSomethingElse();
    });

    function doSomethingElse () {
        // ...
    }
}

Now I'm wondering, is there any better approach? Something simpler and more elegant. Like:

doSomething: function () {
    $('.someElement').fadeIn(function () {
        // do this in an async way...
    });

    // simply do something else here...
}

This problem really bugs me, because I like clean code and I don't like this simple, yet un-clean solutions.

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2 Answers

Create a mediatory variable to refer to your original object:

doSomething: function () {
    var that = this;
    $('.someElement').fadeIn(function() {
       // use "that" here
    });
}
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If doSomethingElse() is another animation, you can chain and queue them mantaining the original context.

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