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Following code gets executed whenever I want to persist any entity. Things seems to be working fine but I fail to understand how it works !

EntityManager em = getEntityManager();
EntityTransaction userTransaction = em.getTransaction();
userTransaction.begin();
em.persist( ent );
userTransaction.commit();

The EntityManager above is a single instance shared by whole application. After starting the transaction; I just say em.persist(entity).. How does hibernate know it belongs to which transaction !

Suppose there are 10 concurrent users on my application and all 10 threads executing above code. So 10 independent transactions are getting created and committed. But all 10 different entities I am not associating them with their respective transactions; so how is JPA able to work it out !

Based on answers; we have below; are we saying that we should have an EntityManager instance per thread ? Will that not be a kill on the server ! Should we be pooling these instances ? Will it not be equal to again implementing sort of Connection Pooling ?

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2  
What do you mean "which transaction"? An EM has a single (local) Transaction at any time; it doesn't have multiple. Sharing a single EM across multiple threads is a recipe for problems, since it is not guaranteed to be thread-safe. –  DataNucleus Jun 27 '12 at 7:46
    
docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/4.0/hem/en-US/html/… A EntityManagerFactory is an expensive-to-create, threadsafe object intended to be shared by all application threads. It is created once, usually on application startup. An EntityManager is an inexpensive, non-threadsafe object that should be used once, for a single business process, a single unit of work, and then discarded –  Deepak Jun 27 '12 at 18:49
    
On further reading; what I understand is that creation of EntityManager is lightweight but still not very light weight that for each small DB operation we create it. Suggested solution is to create EM per request. So, which looks like it should be at ThreadLocal level. –  Deepak Jun 27 '12 at 18:59
    
I understand EntityManager is not threadsafe for which we should create new objects. But do we need to create new EntityManagers for select query too ( for which we dont start any transaction ) .. Will that not be overkill ? –  Deepak Jun 28 '12 at 18:39
    
An EntityManager needs to be created when you need an EntityManager operation, and if you need a Query then how else do you get the Query? –  DataNucleus Jun 29 '12 at 5:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It works because you are lucky enough. Lucky enough means that commit and begin are called in right order - accidentally.

You do use single instance of entity manager from multiple threads. That is wrong thing to do, because it is not guaranteed to be thred safe. Access to resource level transaction via EntityTransaction is bound to entity manager instance, not to the thread.

So result is that you are sharing same EntityTransaction and using it luckily serially for multiple transactions. Using it serially to strart and end multiple transaction is fine, but using it from many threads is not.

In hibernate (4.1.4) reference is stored to tx instance field in AbstractEntityManageImpl class, but that is just implementation detail.

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are we saying that we should have an EntityManager instance per thread ? Will that not be a kill on the server ! Should we be pooling these instances ? Will it not be equal to again implementing sort of Connection Pooling ? –  Deepak Jun 27 '12 at 12:22
1  
EntityManager is quite light object to create, EntityManagerFactory is heavy weight. No reason to start pool entity managers. –  Mikko Maunu Jun 27 '12 at 12:37
    
I understand EntityManager is not threadsafe for which we should create new objects. But do we need to create new EntityManagers for select query too ( for which we dont start any transaction ) .. Will that not be overkill ? –  Deepak Jun 28 '12 at 18:39
    
It does not make difference is it used for SELECT, UPDATE, or INSERT. One instance can be used for multiple queries/operations, but not simultaneously. –  Mikko Maunu Jun 30 '12 at 15:57

It's using ThreadLocal variables for the Transaction.

See also the documentation for UserTransaction:

begin()
Create a new transaction and associate it with the current thread.

You should not share the EntityManager though since it is not guaranteed to be thread-safe.

However if you are injecting it in an EJB, you don't have to worry about thread-safety: http://www.adam-bien.com/roller/abien/entry/is_in_an_ejb_injected

If you are using Spring to inject it, you'll get a thread-safe proxy: http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.1.RELEASE/spring-framework-reference/html/orm.html#orm-jpa-straight

Although EntityManagerFactory instances are thread-safe, EntityManager instances are not. The injected JPA EntityManager behaves like an EntityManager fetched from an application server's JNDI environment, as defined by the JPA specification. It delegates all calls to the current transactional EntityManager, if any; otherwise, it falls back to a newly created EntityManager per operation, in effect making its usage thread-safe.

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That is not true at least for fresh implementations of Hibernate. Why would it use ThreadLocal in object which is ment to be used from single thread only? –  Mikko Maunu Jun 27 '12 at 8:52
1  
It seems to depend on where you use it: stackoverflow.com/questions/8603478/… –  Sandro Jun 27 '12 at 9:19
    
No, injection does not itself make single instance of entity manager thread safe. Instead serialized access to ejb provider by container guarantees that it is not used simultaneously from multiple threads. You can also use jndi lookup instead of injection and guarantee thread safety by ejb contract. –  Mikko Maunu Jun 27 '12 at 11:26
    
Injection can do this by injecting a proxy that delegates to a thread specific instance. Spring does this: static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.1.RELEASE/… –  Sandro Jun 27 '12 at 11:36
    
Of course, that is right. I just didn't saw any reason to assume that Spring components are used in this case. –  Mikko Maunu Jun 27 '12 at 12:53

The transaction is associated with the current thread somehow, using a ThreadLocal variable.

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So is above design flawless or not ! I am still confused ! –  Deepak Jun 27 '12 at 10:08
    
It all depends on how you get an instance of EntityManager. If it's injected in EJBs or in Spring beans (as explained in the Spring documentation), the EntityManager is in fact a proxy to the actual EntityManager implementation. If not, see Mikko Maunu's answer. –  JB Nizet Jun 27 '12 at 10:17
    
I understand EntityManager is not threadsafe for which we should create new objects. But do we need to create new EntityManagers for select query too ( for which we dont start any transaction ) .. Will that not be overkill ? –  Deepak Jun 28 '12 at 18:39

I recommend you understand how JTA works regardless of Hibernate - it's quite important for your to understand
In addition, read about container-managed transactions and bean managed transactions.
If you're working in a container-managed transaction, you can specify for the bean you're injecting the EntityManager to what is the transaction scope -
for example - if the scope is REQUIRED, it means that if another bean calls this bean, and not in context of transaction, a new transaction will be open. If a transaction already exists, then you will use the same transaction. It is important to understand this, as transactions are an expensive resource in your system.

A transaction object is associated with ThreadLocal, however, another thread may resume a suspended transaction, depends on the implementation of your TransactionManager (I am talking about JBossTransactionManager)

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He's using local transactions here, as shown by the call to em.getTransaction(). And in that case there is only 1 transaction per EM, and his design is flawed. –  DataNucleus Jun 27 '12 at 8:57

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