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Is there such a beastie? The simple SOAP client that ships with PHP does not understand multi-part messages. Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The native PHP SoapClient class does not support multipart messages (and is strongly limited in all WS-* matters) and I also I think that neither the PHP written libraries NuSOAP nor Zend_Soap can deal with this sort of SOAP messages.

I can think of two solutions:

  • extend the SoapClient class and overwrite the SoapClient::__doRequest() method to get hold of the actual response string which you can then parse at your whim.

    class MySoapClient extends SoapClient
    {
        public function __doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way = 0)
        {
            $response = parent::__doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way);
            // parse $response, extract the multipart messages and so on
        }
    }
    

    This could be somewhat tricky though - but worth a try.

  • use a more sophisticated SOAP client library for PHP. The first and only one that comes into my mind is WSO2 WSF/PHP which features SOAP MTOM, WS-Addressing, WS-Security, WS-SecurityPolicy, WS-Secure Conversation and WS-ReliableMessaging at the cost of having to install a native PHP extension.

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Using S. Gehrig second idea worked just fine here.

In most cases, you have just a single message packed into a MIME MultiPart message. In those cases a "SoapFault exception: [Client] looks like we got no XML document" exception is thrown. Here the following class should do just fine:

class MySoapClient extends SoapClient
{
    public function __doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way = 0)
    {
        $response = parent::__doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way);
        // strip away everything but the xml.
        $response = preg_replace('#^.*(<\?xml.*>)[^>]*$#s', '$1', $response);
        return $response;
    }
}
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I think "__doRequest" should be "_doRequest". –  understack May 27 '10 at 19:14

Just to add more light to previous suggested steps. You must be getting response in following format

    --uuid:eca72cdf-4e96-4ba9-xxxxxxxxxx+id=108
Content-ID: <http://tempuri.org/0>
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
Content-Type: application/xop+xml;charset=utf-8;type="text/xml"

<s:Envelope xmlns:s="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"><s:Body> content goes here </s:Body></s:Envelope>
--uuid:c19585dd-6a5a-4c08-xxxxxxxxx+id=108--

Just use following code (I am not that great with regex so using string functions)

 public function __doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way = 0)
{
    $response = parent::__doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way);
    // strip away everything but the xml.
    $response = stristr(stristr($response, "<s:"), "</s:Envelope>", true) . "</s:Envelope>";
return $response;
}
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Follow the advice of rafinskipg from the PHP documentation:

Support for MTOM addign this code to your project:

<?php 
class MySoapClient extends SoapClient
{
    public function __doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way = 0)
    {
        $response = parent::__doRequest($request, $location, $action, $version, $one_way);
        // parse $response, extract the multipart messages and so on

        //this part removes stuff
        $start=strpos($response,'<?xml');
        $end=strrpos($response,'>');    
        $response_string=substr($response,$start,$end-$start+1);
        return($response_string);
    }
}

?>

Then you can do this

<?php
  new MySoapClient($wsdl_url);
?>
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