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how to translate this Haskell code:

import Text.ParserCombinators.Parsec((<|>), unexpected, lookAhead, noneOf, char)
import Control.Monad(when)

data BracketElement = BEChar Char | BEChars String | BEColl String | BEEquiv String | BEClass String

p_set_elem_char = do 
  c <- noneOf "]"
  when (c == '-') $ do
    atEnd <- (lookAhead (char ']') >> return True) <|> (return False)
    when (not atEnd) (unexpected "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket")
  return (BEChar c)

to FParsec ? Preferable way is without monadic syntax to provide good performance.

Thanks in advance, Alexander.

Sorry for little misleading. I slightly corrected problem to make Haskell code compilable:

import Text.ParserCombinators.Parsec((<|>), (<?>), unexpected, lookAhead, noneOf, char)
import Control.Monad(when)
import Data.Functor.Identity
import qualified Text.Parsec.Prim as PR

-- | BracketElement is internal to this module
data BracketElement = BEChar Char | BEChars String | BEColl String | BEEquiv String | BEClass String
                    deriving Show

p_set_elem_char :: PR.ParsecT [Char] u Identity BracketElement  
p_set_elem_char = do 
  c <- noneOf "]"
  when (c == '-') $ do
    atEnd <- (lookAhead (char ']') >> return True) <|> (return False)
    when (not atEnd) (unexpected "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket")
  return (BEChar c)

Now it is possible to reproduce *p_set_elem_char* computation.

I sincerely thank all of which who helped me.

I made my own approximation, but unfortunately not so functional as it could be:

type BracketElement = BEChar of char 
                    | BEChars of string 
                    | BEColl of string 
                    | BEEquiv of string 
                    | BEClass of string

let p_set_elem_char : Parser<BracketElement, _> = 
    fun stream ->
        let stateTag = stream.StateTag
        let reply = (noneOf "]") stream
        let chr = reply.Result
        let mutable reply2 = Reply(BEChar chr)
        if reply.Status = Error && stateTag = stream.StateTag then
            reply2.Status <- Error
            reply2.Error <-  reply.Error
        else if chr = '-' && stream.Peek() <> ']' then
            reply2.Status <- Error
            reply2.Error <- messageError ("A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket")
        reply2
share|improve this question
4  
Have you at least tried to do this yourself? –  John Palmer Jun 27 '12 at 10:07
1  
Please do try, and please supply us with your proposed code and explain why it doesn't match your expectations. –  Ramon Snir Jun 27 '12 at 10:32
    
Yes, but I'm a newbie, so I got some scribbles. And I read FParsec's sources like a dog: understand completely all but can't said nothing. A gap between active and passive lexicon :) –  alexander.vladislav.popov Jun 27 '12 at 10:37
    
oh my.. that looks like it will run fast. Just a note - if speed is that important to you, why bother with FParsec? Manually written parser will give you the top speed. –  toyvo Jun 28 '12 at 13:47
    
Your code looks fine, but you shouldn't have to use the low-level API for something so trivial. –  Daniel Jun 28 '12 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

Using the BracketElement type in toyvo's answer, you could do something like

let pBEChar : Parser<_, unit> = 
  let c = 
    pchar '-' .>> followedByL (pchar ']') "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket"
    <|> noneOf "-]"
  c |>> BEChar
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you indeed, but your computation is slightly different from the original problem. To test it you can compare run pBEChar "-]";; and PR.parseTest p_set_elem_char "-]" (I made original code compilable). –  alexander.vladislav.popov Jun 28 '12 at 5:33
    
Oops...I misread. You want followedByL instead. Code is corrected. –  Daniel Jun 28 '12 at 14:19

I don't know much FParsec, but here is a naive attempt, corrected a bit for performance based on the comments:

type BracketElement =
    | BEChar of char
    | BEChars of string
    | BEColl of string
    | BEEquiv of string
    | BEClass of string

let parseBEChar : Parser<BracketElement,unit> =
    let okChars = noneOf "]"
    let endTest =
        (lookAhead (skipChar ']') >>. parse.Return(true))
        <|> parse.Return(false)
    let failure = fail "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket"
    parse {
        let! c = okChars
        if c = '-' then
            let! atEnd = endTest
            if not atEnd then
                return! failure
            else
                return BEChar c
        else
            return BEChar c
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It may be worth noting: the monadic syntax is no longer recommended, particularly when performance is a concern (quanttec.com/fparsec/users-guide/where-is-the-monad.html). –  Daniel Jun 27 '12 at 14:14
    
@Daniel, certainly, but the parser algorithm here is dynamic, how do you work around that? There's going to be at least one >>= anyway, as you can't write this in terms of Applicative operators. Unless there's some sort of ifThenElse in FParsec? –  toyvo Jun 27 '12 at 15:00

Similar to what Daniel proposed, you could write that parser as

let pSetElementChar : Parser<_,unit> = 
    satisfy (function '-' | ']' -> false | _ -> true)
    <|> (pchar '-' .>> followedByString "]")
    |>> BEChar

If you want to add your custom message to the error, you could use followedByL like in Daniel's answer or you could add the message using the fail primitive

let pSetElementChar2 : Parser<_,unit> = 
  satisfy (function '-' | ']' -> false | _ -> true)
  <|> (pchar '-' .>> (followedByString "]" 
                      <|> fail "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket"))
  |>> BEChar

A low-level implementation can be as simple as

let pSetElementChar3 : Parser<_,unit> =
  fun stream ->
    let c = stream.ReadCharOrNewline()
    if c <> EOS then
      if c <> '-' || stream.Peek() = ']' then Reply(BEChar c)
      else Reply(Error, messageError "A dash is in the wrong place in a bracket")
    else
      Reply(Error, unexpected "end of input")
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