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I am developing an Android application. This app deals with contact information (name, number, photo), which I need to store locally for later processing. This data also needs to be modified frequently.

What would be a good way to achieve this? I was thinking of "File input stream Internal file storage(achieved by serialized)" and SQLite, but am confused about both of them.

Can anyone tell me the difference between these two in terms of performance, speed, memory consumption etc.?

(Besides, what is SQLite3?)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(My personal opinion)

Database is slow compare to File but it help you in getting data in arranging formats and easily you can perform any aggregate function on it. I suggest you to use Database in your requirements. As you can store particular record in arranged format.

SQLite is a software library that implements a self-contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional SQL database engine.

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Using Database you can easily update, remove and insert your data records. –  user370305 Jun 27 '12 at 10:01
    
do sqlite take more space than file type for storing? –  Amarnath Jun 27 '12 at 10:02
    
No, but its depends on your data what have you stored in that. Its same applicable to File also. –  user370305 Jun 27 '12 at 10:03
    
thanks i will go with sqlite –  Amarnath Jun 27 '12 at 10:04
    
Definitely, even Android native phonebook application uses the same SQLite concept. –  user370305 Jun 27 '12 at 10:06

as your data is like contact information name, number, photo for any people so prefer SQlite it will be easy and effiecent to add update and delete

Consider the point native Contact also uses the SQlite for same type of data set

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