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I would assume this is possible, but i just cant figure it out..

i have a site thats basic structure is set up as follows.

<div id="header"></div>

<div id="main">
    <div id="navigation"></div>
    <div id="content"></div>
</div>

<div id="footer"></div>

The navigation is a left hand navigation with a content div to the right of it. I would like to scale the navigation vertically to be the same height as the content div depending on what is loaded into the content div. the information for the content div is pulled in through PHP, so it is different every time. anyway long story short. Is there a way to set it so that my navigation will always be the full height of the content div no matter which page is loaded?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 73 down vote accepted

I suggest you take a look at Equal Height Columns with Cross-Browser CSS and No Hacks.

Basically, doing this with CSS in a browser compatible way is not trivial (but trivial with tables) so find yourself an appropriate pre-packaged solution.

Also, the answer varies on whether you want 100% height or equal height. Usually it's equal height. If it's 100% height the answer is slightly different.

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2  
This looks like a nice solution until you draw a border border:1px solid blue e.g. on container2 : the blue border is on the first two columns, not on the second column only as you would have expected. –  Julien Kronegg Mar 7 '13 at 12:17
    
This looks like a nice solution provided you could see it. Just checked and the site was down. If it is gone for good, or if it happens to be down when you check, you could use this wayback machine's copy. –  Majid Fouladpour Apr 2 '13 at 14:43
23  
"No hacks"? Are you kidding, it's incredibly hackish, and actually places half-hidden-divs as containers to the columns in order for it to look right. –  Hugo Jun 19 '13 at 1:11
2  
@Hugo I totally agree! A 6 page article written on howto do something that takes 5 seconds with tables!? and those 50+ lines of CSS is supposed to be easier to read/manage than 3 <td> elements wrapped in a table!? –  bfritz Jun 19 '13 at 23:20
    
Thumbs up for sharing great article.. –  Pilot May 19 at 2:50

This is a frustrating issue that's dealt with designers all the time. The trick is that you need to set the height to 100% on BODY and HTML in your CSS.

html,body {
    height:100%;
}

This seemingly pointless code is to define to the browser what 100% means. Frustrating, yes, but is the simplest way.

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Travis, thanks this is precisely what I needed. –  Kevin Roche Sep 6 '11 at 14:12
    
The fact that the html element also had to be styled to height:100% had slipped my mind, and I was getting pretty puzzled just now. Thank you for saving me from my brain fart :) –  sampablokuper Apr 21 '12 at 2:29
4  
Except it does not always work, for example if you have a relative positioned element inside an absolute positioned one, it no longer forces hasLayout. –  tim May 15 '13 at 0:11
1  
that didn't seem to make any difference at all. –  ThatAintWorking Mar 13 at 22:48
1  
This only works if all the parents have height 100%, it's not enough to set only the html and the body, all parents must have a height defined. –  RaduM May 15 at 18:38

If you don't mind the navigation div being clipped in the event of an unexpectedly-short content div, there's at least one easy way:

#main {
position: relative;
}

#main #navigation {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 0;
bottom: 0;
width: 10em; /* or whatever */
}

#main #content {
margin: 0;
margin-left: 10em; /* or whatever width you set for #navigation */
}

Elsewise there's the faux-columns technique.

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Thanks a ton, you saved my day. Didn't knew one could define both top and bottom and it would work this way. –  rubish Mar 14 '13 at 2:37
    
This will make the content of the container stop resizing it. –  DreamWave Aug 5 '13 at 7:58

I find that setting the two columns to display:table-cell instead of float:left works well.

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7  
Downside: no IE7 support –  Blazemonger Apr 18 '12 at 15:23
20  
(2014) I think we can let down IE7 now. –  jurihandl Jan 13 at 13:05
2  
It's not about letting down a browser, but sometimes it's "client needs". Btw, it's been 2 years since that comment. –  Ron Jeremy Jan 14 at 15:53
1  
MS themselves don't support it anymore, if that helps anyone convince their clients... –  Heraldmonkey May 4 at 11:51
1  
This should be the accepted answer. Times have changed, this answer works in all browsers(with on small quirk in Safari 5.1.17). Two lines of CSS and you instantly have the effect you're looking for with no draw back I can think of. –  callmetwan May 29 at 0:26

using jQuery:

$(function() {
    function unifyHeights() {
        var maxHeight = 0;
        $('#container').children('#navigation, #content').each(function() {
            var height = $(this).outerHeight();
            // alert(height);
            if ( height > maxHeight ) {
                maxHeight = height;
            }
        });
        $('#navigation, #content').css('height', maxHeight);
    }
    unifyHeights();
});
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7  
Math.max() would be your friend here. –  alex May 28 '12 at 6:34
1  
Couldn't get the CSS to work in all cases for me an really just needed a quick fix. It may not be the most standard approach, but this did the job just fine. Thanks! :-] –  John Dec 20 '12 at 20:47
    
When using JQuery's css function, you cannot differentiate between screen and print media, as you usually do when using pure CSS solutions. Thus, you may have printing issues. –  Julien Kronegg Mar 19 '13 at 7:34

Based on the method described in this article I have created .Less dynamic solution:

Html:

<div id="container3">
    <div id="container2">
        <div id="container1">
            <div id="col1">Column 1</div>
            <div id="col2">Column 2</div>
            <div id="col3">Column 3</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Less:

/* Changes these variables to adjust your columns */
@col1Width: 60%;
@col2Width: 1%;
@padding: 0%;

/* Misc variable. Do not change */
@col3Width: 100% - @col1Width - @col2Width;

#container3 {
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
    background-color: red;
    position: relative;

    #container2 {
        float: left;
        width: 100%;
        position: relative;
        background-color: yellow;
        right: @col3Width;

        #container1 {
            float: left;
            width: 100%;
            position: relative;
            right: @col2Width;
            background-color: green;

            #col1 {
                float: left;
                width: @col1Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding;
                overflow: hidden;
            }

            .col2 {
                float: left;
                width: @col2Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding + @padding * 2;
                overflow: hidden;
            }

            #col3 {
                float: left;
                width: @col3Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding + @padding * 4;
                overflow: hidden;
            }
        }
    }
}
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height : <percent> will only work if you have all parent nodes with specified percent height with a fixed height in pixels, ems, etc. on top level. That way, the height will cascade down to your element.

You can specify 100% to html and body elements as @Travis stated earlier to have the page height cascading down to your nodes.

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I was in the same problem,

I know everyone hates tables, but for me it was the solution that worked best in browser compatibility.

<table id="main">
  <tr>
    <td id="navigation"></td>
    <td id="content"></td>
  </tr>
</table>

I didn't even changed any CSS or extra code, it worked as is.

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3  
you don't have to use the actual <table> tag - the table display attributes can be added to any element –  DreamWave Aug 5 '13 at 8:00

Try making the bottom margin 100%.

margin-bottom: 100%;
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#main {
    overflow: hidden;
}
#navigation, #content {
    margin-bottom: -1000px;
    padding-bottom: 1000px;
}
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There is a bit of a contradiction in the question's title and the content. The title speaks of a parent div, but the question makes it sound like you want two sibling divs (navigation and content) to be the same height.

Do you (a) want both navigation and content to be 100% the height of main, or (b) want navigation and content to be be same height?

I'll assume (b)...if that is so, I don't think you will be able to do it given your current page structure (at least, not with pure CSS and no scripting). You would probably need to do something like:

<main div>
    <content div>
         <navigation div></div>
    </div>
</div>

and set the content div to have a left margin of whatever the width of the navigation pane is. That way, the content's content is to the right of the navigation and you can set the navigation div to be 100% of the content's height.

EDIT: I'm doing this completely in my head, but you would probably also need to set the navigation div's left margin to a negative value or set it's absolute left to 0 to shove it back to the far left. Problem is, there are many ways to pull this off but not all of them are going to be compatible with all browsers.

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[Referring to Dmity's Less code in another answer] I'm guessing that this is some kind of "pseudo-code"?

From what I understand try using the faux-columns technique that should do the trick.

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/fauxcolumns/

Hope this helps :)

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I don't think its pseudo code. I think its broken html 5 –  Dave Archer Jul 14 '09 at 13:29
1  
Depending on sorting order of answers, it is hard to tell what "this" refers to... I am guessing it is about Dmitry's code. Thus, this remark belongs to a comment below his answer! And, for your information, it is not pseudo-code, it is code in the Less language, a way of defining CSS in a procedural way. –  PhiLho Apr 29 '13 at 12:30

For the parent:

display: flex;

For childs:

align-items: stretch;

You should add some prefixes, http://css-tricks.com/using-flexbox/.

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The easiest way to do this is to just fake it. A List Apart has covered this extensively over the years, like in this article from Dan Cederholm from 2004.

Here's how I usually do it:

<div id="container" class="clearfix" style="margin:0 auto;width:950px;background:white url(SOME_REPEATING_PATTERN.png) scroll repeat-y center top;">
    <div id="navigation" style="float:left;width:190px;padding-right:10px;">
        <!-- Navigation -->
    </div>
    <div id="content" style="float:left;width:750px;">
        <!-- Content -->
    </div>
</div>

You can easily add a header onto this design by wrapping #container in another div, embedding the header div as #container's sibling, and moving the margin and width styles to the parent container. Also, the CSS should be moved into a separate file and not kept inline, etc. etc. Finally, the clearfix class can be found on positioniseverything.

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