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I am having a hard time figuring how to design classes that can't initialize all their internal members in the constructor. I know that this should be something basic and discussed all over the net, but I'm not sure what to look for. So, for example, please consider the following code:

#include <iostream>

class Workhorse
{
public:
    void SetData (const int &data)
    {
        this->data = data;
    }

    int GetData () const
    {
        return this->data;
    }

private:
    int data;
};

class Worker
{
public:
    Worker ()
    {
    }
    void Initialize (const int &data)
    {
        horse.SetData(data);
    }
    void Action () const
    {
        std::cout << horse.GetData() << std::endl;
    }

private:
    Workhorse horse;
};

int main ()
{
    Worker worker;
    worker.Initialize(3);
    worker.Action();
    return 0;
}

I want to prevent the workers from calling any methods without first calling Initialize(). The layman's implementation would be to add an isInitialized flag in the Worker class, set it to true in Initialize() and test it at the beginning of each public method (maybe also in the protected / private ones, if we introduce some inheritance?). Unfortunately, this seems a bit cumbersome and hard to maintain. Also, it's just awful to repeat an if statement in all methods. I haven't even began to ponder about thread safety issues, but, right now, I'm only implementing a single-threaded application. Is there a smarter way to design this?


EDIT: OK, I chose a dumb design as an example, which, indeed, is flawed. Let me try to give a clearer picture of what I have:

#include <iostream>

class PublicKeyCryptoProvider
{
public:
    struct PublicKey
    {
        int shared;
    };
    struct PrivateKey
    {
        int secret;
    };

    int Encrypt (const int &plaintext) const
    {
        int ciphertext;
        //apply encryption algorithm on plaintext
        ciphertext = plaintext * this->pk.shared;
        return ciphertext;
    }

    int Decrypt (const int &ciphertext) const
    {
        int plaintext;
        //apply decryption algorithm on ciphertext
        plaintext = ciphertext / this->sk.secret;

        return plaintext;
    }

    void GenerateKeys ()
    {
        this->pk.shared = 4;
        this->sk.secret = 4;
        //generate pk and sk
    }

    void SetPublicKey (const PublicKey &pk)
    {
        this->pk = pk;
    }

    const PublicKey &GetPublicKey () const
    {
        return this->pk;
    }

private:
    PublicKey pk;
    PrivateKey sk;
};

int main ()
{
    /* scenario 1: */
    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider;
    cryptoProvider.GenerateKeys();
    std::cout << cryptoProvider.Decrypt(cryptoProvider.Encrypt(3)) << std::endl;
    /* /scenario 1: */

    /* scenario 2: */
    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider1;
    cryptoProvider1.GenerateKeys();

    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider2;
    cryptoProvider2.SetPublicKey(cryptoProvider1.GetPublicKey());

    int ciphertext = cryptoProvider2.Encrypt(3);
    std::cout << cryptoProvider1.Decrypt(ciphertext) << std::endl;

    //now let's do something bad...
    std::cout << cryptoProvider2.Decrypt(ciphertext) << std::endl;
    /* /scenario 2: */

    return 0;
}

Obviously, you can imagine real life examples where scenario 2 is perfectly valid. Given the above situation, is there any better option than adding a canDecrypt flag inside the PublicKeyCryptoProvider class, which is set to true when generating keys and then tested at the beginning of the decrypt method? I have to mention that this is a very simple example, because, in my case, the PublicKeyCryptoProvider can perform faster encryptions if it is the owner of the secret key and it has much more public methods, so I would be doomed to test the flag more than a couple of times... Also, I have a client - server mockup scenario where the server exposes a bunch of public methods for the client, but the client can only call the methods after it has called the Initialize() method on the server...

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1  
Many operating system calls (on many systems) uses the isInitialized method. Other are documented in clear terms stating that calling function foo without calling fooInit first will cause problems. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 27 '12 at 10:25
2  
If you example is representative of your system, then the problem is in your architecture (see Adrien's answer below). C++ is as its best when you make good use of the RAII pattern; your constructors shoull construct and initialise fully. If you're wedded to this partial initialisation scheme, you'll need to check an initialisation status flag everywhere. It is the price you have to pay for poor architecture. –  Rook Jun 27 '12 at 10:29
    
@JoachimPileborg Indeed, you are right, but I was wondering if, maybe, there is a clever design pattern that I am not aware of... –  Mihai Todor Jun 27 '12 at 11:46
    
@Rook I have added a better example to illustrate my predicament. Please let me know if you think this new example can be refactored into something that achieves RAII. –  Mihai Todor Jun 27 '12 at 11:47
    
@MihaiTodor: Under what situations is it necessary to have a PublicKeyCryptoProvider which does not have any keys? I am inclined to feel that either a) you must provide keys (or request their generation) at construction time, or alternatively b) the calls to Encrypt and Decrypt should take a key as a parameter. –  Rook Jun 27 '12 at 11:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Great question! Its always good to make an API that is hard to use wrong, and as you are observing classes that are not fully constructed are dangerous, hard to use correctly and easy to use wrong. They set ourselves & others up for failure. I've done some refactoring on your second example to come up with a safer design that won't even allow your "do something bad" code.

The general idea was that PublicKeyCryptoProvider had too many responsibilities ( violation of SRP ):

  • Key generation
  • Key storage
  • Encryption
  • Decryption

Each one of the responsibilities has been delegated out. Now the PublicKeyCryptoProvider is more responsible for giving you the tools necessary to do encryption/decryption & key management.

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

struct PublicKey
{
    int shared;
};
struct PrivateKey
{
    int secret;
};

struct KeyPair
{
    PublicKey public_key;
    PrivateKey private_key;
};


struct Encryptor
{
    Encryptor( PublicKey shared_ )
     : shared( shared_ )
    {}

    int Encrypt (const int &plaintext) const
    {
        int ciphertext;
        //apply encryption algorithm on plaintext
        ciphertext = plaintext * shared.shared;
        return ciphertext;
    }

private:
    PublicKey shared;
};

struct Decryptor
{
    Decryptor( PrivateKey secret_ )
     : secret( secret_ )
    {}

    int Decrypt (const int &ciphertext) const
    {
        int plaintext;
        //apply decryption algorithm on ciphertext
        plaintext = ciphertext / secret.secret;

        return plaintext;
    }

private:
    PrivateKey secret;
};

class PublicKeyCryptoProvider
{
public:

    KeyPair GenerateKeys()
    {
        KeyPair keys;

        //generate pk and sk
        keys.public_key.shared = 4;
        keys.private_key.secret = 4;

        return keys;
    }


    Decryptor BuildDecryptor( PrivateKey key )
    {
        return Decryptor( key );
    }

    Encryptor BuildEncryptor( PublicKey key )
    {
        return Encryptor( key );
    }


/* These are replaced by directly building an Encryptor/Decryptor
 when you have a public or private key.

    void SetPublicKey (const PublicKey &pk)
    {
        this->pk = pk;
    }

    const PublicKey &GetPublicKey () const
    {
        return this->pk;
    }
*/

};

int main ()
{
    /* scenario 1: */
    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider;
    auto keys = cryptoProvider.GenerateKeys();
    auto decryptor = cryptoProvider.BuildDecryptor(keys.private_key);
    auto encryptor = cryptoProvider.BuildEncryptor(keys.public_key);

    std::cout << decryptor.Decrypt( encryptor.Encrypt(3) ) << std::endl;
    /* /scenario 1: */

    /* scenario 2: */
    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider1;
    auto keys1 = cryptoProvider1.GenerateKeys();

    PublicKeyCryptoProvider cryptoProvider2;
    auto encryptor2 = cryptoProvider2.BuildEncryptor(keys.public_key);

    int ciphertext = encryptor2.Encrypt(3);
    std::cout << decryptor.Decrypt(ciphertext) << std::endl;

    // I Can't do anything bad - the API has protected me from doing bad things! Yeah!
    //std::cout << cryptoProvider2.Decrypt(ciphertext) << std::endl;
    /* /scenario 2: */

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now that is a really nice answer and just about what I was looking for. I like the proxy implementations from the other answers, but I think this design fits better. Because my CryptoProvider is rather meant to be a base abstract class for multiple types of public key cryptosystems, I can hammer out this design to make it work for my implementation. My current implementation is going to require a good amount of work and some refactoring, but I really like what you did here. Thanks again! –  Mihai Todor Jul 2 '12 at 12:22

I would do the following :

    class Worker
{
public:
    Worker (const int& data)
    {
        horse.SetData(data);
    }

    void Action () const
    {
        std::cout << horse.GetData() << std::endl;
    }

private:
    Workhorse horse;
};

Since you obviously don't want a Worker object to exist without being initialized, its initialization should be a part of its construction, and it should be instanciated without this initialization since it can't work without it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out that my example is poorly designed. I have added a new one, which, hopefully illustrates this issue better. Please let me know if there's any way to redesign my new example in order to avoid the canDecrypt flag. –  Mihai Todor Jun 27 '12 at 11:49

It sounds like the behaviour you're interested in would entail having a class that acts as a manager, deciding whether to provide access to one of Workhorse's function, or a dummy function instead. One possibility would be to create an abstract parent class (Horse) specifying the interface of Workhorse, but not implementing any of the functions. Derive from it two classes, Workhorse, and TrojanHorse. TrojanHorse would implement all of the functions in the parent class as Shells, Workhorse would be as you've already created it.

The manager class could have the initialize function you're interested in, and it could store an object of type Horse. By default, the horse object could be assigned to a TrojanHorse object, but initialize would instead assign it to a Workhorse object.

This solution would avoid almost all of the speed impact from if statements, it would be maintainable in the sense that the compiler would give errors if the classes weren't changed in the proper manner, and it would still be comprehensible to another programmer looking at the code.

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You mentioned that you didn't think inheritance is the way to go, but there is a fairly clean way to do this with minimal inheritance.

A couple of design patterns are useful here. If you split the interface away from the implementation and think of the implementations as "always return an error" and "do something useful", you can view these two implementations as strategies and the interface as a proxy.

The proxy always forwards on it's calls to an implementation, and there is always an implementation (no need to check a flag).

The interface is initialized with a default implementation that causes an error of some kind (assert, throw, etc.). This is an example

Here's an example that I threw together that compiles with Clang 3.2:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <cassert>
#include <stdexcept>

// Base class that defines the signatures of the functions to be forwarded.
// Another nice benefit is that each implementation can store whatever 
// specific data they need.
class Impl {
public:
    virtual void FuncA() = 0;
};


typedef std::unique_ptr<Impl> ImplPtr;


class ErrorImpl : public Impl {
public:
    virtual void FuncA() { 
        assert(!"Don't call this before calling InitializeImpl!");
        throw std::runtime_error("Don't call this before calling InitializeImpl!");  
    }     
};

class OtherImpl : public Impl {
public:
    void FuncA() { 
        std::cout << "Some other useful functionality here.\n";
    }         
};

// This is the class that user's will call.
class Proxy {
public:
    Proxy() : impl_( ImplPtr(new ErrorImpl) ) {}

    void InitializeImpl( ImplPtr ptr ) {
        // You must std::move std::unique_ptr's.
        impl_ = std::move( ptr );
    }
    void FuncA() { impl_->FuncA(); }

private:
    ImplPtr impl_;
};


int main( int, char**) {
    Proxy p;
    // p.FuncA(); // asserts & throws.

    p.InitializeImpl( ImplPtr(new OtherImpl) );
    p.FuncA();

    return 0;
}
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If you must delay the object initialization, I would propose the usage of a proxy with an access operator throwing if the proxy is not initialized. Initialize the proxy whenever you want. You don't need an if check in each of your methods, but that check if moved to the proxy. Some smart pointer would have been handy. But, as far as I know they don't throw if the containing pointer is uninitialized. So, you might need one of your own as given below.

#include <iostream>

class Workhorse
{
public:
    void SetData (const int &data)
    {
        this->data = data;
    }

    int GetData () const
    {
        return this->data;
    }

private:
    int data;
};

template <typename T> class Proxy
{
public:

    Proxy() : myObject(0)
    {
    }
    Proxy(T* anObj) : myObject(anObj)
    {
    }
    ~Proxy()
    {
        delete myObject;
        myObject = 0;
    }
    T* operator ->()const
    {
        if(NULL == myObject)
        {
            throw;  //  Bad object. Substitute an appropriate exception code.
        }
        return myObject;
    }

private:
    T* myObject;
};

class Worker
{
public:
    Worker ()
    {
    }
    ~Worker ()
    {
    }
    void Initialize (const int &data)
    {
        horse = new Workhorse;
        horse->SetData(data);
    }
    void Action () const
    {
            // Here no need to check if the horse is initialized.
        std::cout << horse->GetData() << std::endl;
    }

private:
    Proxy<Workhorse> horse;
};
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