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My website needs a lot of screen space in order to be useful. The minimum width that works fine is about 1200 px. The problem is that when it's opened on screens with lower resolution (iPhone or old computers), the page doesn't fit fully into the screen and it gets cut on the left side.

Does anyone have an idea what I could do that instead it'd just be scrollable?

I use CSS layer for the whole page

#page {
position:absolute;
left:50%;
width:1200px;
margin-left:-600px; 
}

and then inside this layer I have the actual content:

#content {
width:1200px;
text-align: left;
font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
font-size: 14px;
font-weight: normal;
color: #aaaaaa;
clear:both; 
margin-top:40px;
}

I understand that probably the reason is the margin-left: -600px setting but then how do I make sure that the whole content block is centered? Or do I just have to align it to the left side instead?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

PS - the website is on http://textexture.com and here's the CSS I use: http://textexture.com/templates/styles.css

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
instead of using defined width try going for % – Kitler Jun 27 '12 at 11:05

Try this instead:

#page {
    width: 1200px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

#content {
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-weight: normal;
    color: #aaaaaa;
    clear:both; 
    margin-top:40px;
}

Absolute positioning comes with complications, and should only generally be used if it's actually necessary.

Also, it seems like there's no reason to have separate #page and #content divs. Try deleting #page and combing them:

#content {
    width: 1200px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-weight: normal;
    color: #aaaaaa;
    clear:both; 
    margin-top:40px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it worked! – deemeetree Jun 28 '12 at 12:22
    
Don't forget to accept correct answers to your questions :) – David Oliver Jun 28 '12 at 15:56
    
i did that ) or am i missing something? – deemeetree Jun 28 '12 at 21:32
    
Look for the tick next to the answer you wish to accept. This indicates you accept the answer. – David Oliver Jun 28 '12 at 23:44

Really and truly if you want users with smaller resolutions to be able to use your website you should make it so it works at lower resolutions. There are a few techniques for doing this. The website you've linked to looks pretty simple so it shouldn't be too tricky to change some of your styling.

You might want to look at Responsive Web Design and using media queries in CSS.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, there can be occasions where a website really does need a large resolution and that makes sense for it's audience. Having looked at the link in the question, I'm not convinced this is one of those times. The website could easily be designed narrower, or responsive as suggested in this answer. – Simon Jun 27 '12 at 11:05
    
Thanks. But if I want to make the graph window on the right-hand side stretchable (as well as the text field on the left), is there a way to set up the minimum width that they may have? – deemeetree Jun 28 '12 at 12:25
    
Not sure exactly what you mean but if you're saying you don't want it to go smaller than a certain size, you can use the CSS rules min-width and min-height. – diggersworld Jul 2 '12 at 8:57

You can also work with % like this.

#page {
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

#content {
    font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-weight: normal;
    color: #aaaaaa;
    clear:both; 
    margin-top:40px;
}
share|improve this answer

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