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iPython has this excellent feature of being able to auto-complete modules and this works extremely well in there.

For the longest time, I've had a shell function that allows me to change directories to where a given module is located. It does this by trying to import the name of the module from the first argument and looking into its __file__.

What I would like to do is to find out the importable modules that are available so I can write an auto-complete function for this little helper.

I know that for a give module, I can do something like dir(module_name) and that would give me what I need for that module but I am not sure what to do to find out what I can import, just like iPython when you do something like:

import [TAB]

Or

import St[TAB]

Which would autocomplete all the importable modules that start with St.

I know how to write the auto-completion functionality, I am interesting in just finding the way of knowing what can I import.

EDIT:

Digging through the IPython code I managed to find the exact piece that does the work of getting all of the current modules for the given environment:

from IPython.core.completerlib import module_completion

for module in module_completion('import '): 
    print module

The reason I'm printing the results is because I am actually using this for ZSH completion so I will need to deal with the output.

share|improve this question

As a starting point, you could iterate through the paths in sys.path looking for python modules, as that is exactly what import does. Other than that, Python won’t have an index or something for all modules, as the imports are resolved on run-time, when it’s requested. You could easily provide an index for the built-in modules though and maybe have a cache or something for previously imported modules.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds like a good start. Thanks for the suggestion – alfredodeza Jun 27 '12 at 12:35

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