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It might sound like reinvention of wheel, but I am trying to implement a map, (like Map<K,V>). The class has a function called sortedKey() which returns an ArrayList<K> A cut-down version of my code is below. I have included my attempts to debug inline as comments.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class Map<K,V> {
    private ArrayList<Pair<K,V> > array; //Pair<K,V> is a class defined in another file.

    //returns an ArrayList(of proper type) of keys (ie, the desired function)
    public ArrayList<K> sortedKeys(){
        ArrayList<K> ret = keys(); //another method defined inside same class

        K s = ""; // error: no suitable method found for sort(ArrayList<K>)
        Collections.sort(new ArrayList<String>()); //Works just fine..
        Collections.sort(ret); //Same error here..
        return ret;
    }
}

Any idea on why is that error showing up? Can I not have generic return types depending on the type-variable used in creation of the class? Or do I have to do something else to achieve the desired effect?

Thanks and apologies if this question has already been asked

Cajetan

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1  
Is that line really meant to say K s = "";? That looks flat-out wrong, especially with the error in comments that doesn't match (i.e. mentions a sort invocation). –  Andrzej Doyle Jun 27 '12 at 11:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have a look at the signature of Collections.sort:

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void sort(List<T> list)

So the error, though it might be confusing, is right - you can't call sort on a list of arbitrary type; the element type must implement Comparable.

If you restrict your generic parameter to be comparable, as in:

public class Map<K extends Comparable<K>,V> {
    ...

then the call to Collections.sort(ret) will succeed as you expect.

Without this restriction on the generic parameter, someone could create a Map with a key type of something noncomparable like Exception - and then how do you expect poor Collections.sort to handle that? :)

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Thanks a lot, that solved my problem :) –  Cajetan Rodrigues Jun 27 '12 at 12:10
    
No problem. I often go through a similar step myself when designing generic classes - use unbounded wildcards, and only later realise that it only really makes sense for classes with certain basic properties, such as Serializable or Comparable or Closeable, etc. It's good to be able to express this through the type system as well as just Javadocs. –  Andrzej Doyle Jun 27 '12 at 12:14
    
for best results, use K extends Comparable<? super K> –  newacct Jun 27 '12 at 17:38

The compiler is telling you that K might not be a type with an ordering. You should declare the class as

public class Map<K extends Comparable<K>, V> {

to guarantee that K values can be compared to other K values.

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Thanks a lot, that solved my problem :) –  Cajetan Rodrigues Jun 27 '12 at 12:11
    
for best results, use K extends Comparable<? super K> –  newacct Jun 27 '12 at 17:38
    
True in theory, but I've never seen it actually make a difference in real code. –  Louis Wasserman Jun 27 '12 at 18:30

From the Javadoc for Collection.sort() the type has to be

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> void sort(List<T> list)

In other words, K has to be declared as Comparable<K> or Comparable<? super K>

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Well...you should provide a comparator or implements comparable by your K(whichever it may be) class.

in case of implementing comparable, Also declare class parameter like this to restrict it to contain only comparable object.

public class Map<K extends Comparable<K>, V> 
share|improve this answer
    
for best results, use K extends Comparable<? super K> –  newacct Jun 27 '12 at 17:38

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