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I'm programming a neural field with numpy and for a map of 100*100 neurons, I need to manage a 10000*10000 connections map.

So I create my connection map with meshgrid and I try to applicate an adaptation of Mexican Hat fonction. Here, you have the code you can try: if you put taille = 60 or taille = 70 (the width of the neural map), it will work (on my PC, it's ok) but, if you try with taille = 100, you obtain a MemoryError.

import numpy as np

def connection_map4(width, se1, se2, K, inh):
    x = np.arange(0, width**2, 1)
    y = np.arange(0, width**2, 1)
    X,Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)
    print "Meshgrid cree"
    A1 = 1.0 + inh
    A2 = inh
    # exp(|x-xc|/b + |y-yc|) -> Mexican Hat equation
    # 2D/1D transformation relation: i = width.y + x
    # ligne = (X/witdh - Y/width)**2
    ligne = (X-Y)/width ## empirically, it's the division that doesn't pass.
    print "avant carre"
    ligne *= ligne
    print "ligne"
    colonne = (X%width-Y%width)**2

    print "colonne"
    M1 = A1*np.exp(-(  (colonne)/(2*se1**2) + (ligne)/(2*se2**2) ) )
    print "Premiere operation finie"
    M2 = -A2*np.exp(-(  (colonne)/(2*(K*se1)**2) + (ligne)/(2*(K*se2)**2) ) )
    print "Seconde operation finie"
    return(M1+M2)

taille = 100    
connection_map4(taille, 7.5, 4.0, 2.0, 2.0)

Empirically, after some trials to debug, I have separated each operations on the meshgrid, and it seems that it is the division and the modulo that don't pass.

Is there solution to make this division? I don't really want to use a loop and slow down the computation.

share|improve this question
    
Another solution would be to wrap this function in C using Cython or fortran using f2py. Neither option is particularly pretty, but it would be lighter on the memory since you could then use a loop. –  mgilson Jun 27 '12 at 20:07

2 Answers 2

Basic arithmetic operations on numpy arrays make copies.

>>> a = numpy.arange(10)
>>> b = a + 1
>>> c = b + 1
>>> a
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> b
array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10])
>>> c
array([ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11])

On my machine, a 10000x10000 array of ints takes up 800 MB -- almost a gigabyte. You have two of those, X and Y, and the subtraction operation makes another. Then the division makes yet another... I think you can see where this is going.

My suggestion would be to try doing your operations in-place. You can do this by using the corresponding numpy built-in function and specifying an out value.

>>> d = numpy.subtract(c, 1, out=c)
>>> c
array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10])
>>> d[0] = 5
>>> c
array([ 5,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10])

As you can see, d and c refer to the same data. Of course, an easier way to achieve the same effect is to use in-place operations.

>>> c -= 1
>>> c
array([4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> d
array([4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

Since you aren't creating a copy, this approach should be less memory-intensive. Create as few 800 MB arrays as possible -- you've already got two (X and Y) so you're probably already pushing the upper limit of your computer's memory capacity.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, so this can explain that "line *=line" pass when I suppress the division. But, what I don't understand is that I have 8GB of RAM. So I don't understand why Windows don't want me to use more than 2GB with python. (Because, for 100*100 neural map, it is Windows that stops my program). Can we allow more memory to python environnement? –  user1485163 Jun 27 '12 at 14:16

So, even when I use in-place operations, I use more than 2GB. And in fact, I remember that 32-bit application can't use more than 2GB of RAM on Windows. So I have download Python in 64-bit and Numpy in 64-bit (found at http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/). Note that Numpy doesn't exist officialy in 64-bit, that is strange for computation library. And it works now! I hope that this can be usefull for other people.

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