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I am trying idiomatically merge multiple maps into a single map using clojure.

Input

{:a 1 :b "a"}
{:a 2 :b "b"}
{:a 3 :b "c"}
{:a 4 :b "a"}

Expected

{:a #{1,2,3,4}, :b #{"a" "b" "c"}} 

The values for each key are converted into a set of values in the original maps.

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd use merge-with, using a pre-built structure that contains empty sets:

(def data [{:a 1 :b "a"}
           {:a 2 :b "b"}
           {:a 3 :b "c"}
           {:a 4 :b "a"}])

(let [base {:a #{} :b #{}}]
  (apply merge-with conj base data))

=> {:a #{1 2 3 4}, :b #{"a" "b" "c"}}

The trick of using empty sets in the base map is so that conj has a concrete object to work upon, and hence works correctly.

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This works, but only if you know ahead of time all the keys you'll be matching. A limitation to keep in mind. –  amalloy Jun 28 '12 at 6:29
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merge-with can be used for this like:

(def d [{:a 1 :b "a"}
        {:a 2 :b "b"}
        {:a 3 :b "c"}
        {:a 4 :b "a"}])

(def initial (into {} (map #(vector  %1 [])  (keys (apply merge d)))))

(into {} (map (fn [[a b]] [a (set b)]) 
           (apply merge-with (fn [a b] (conj a b)) initial  d)))
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I strongly discourage this approach. Suppose the value of :a in the first map is [1 2 3] - your flatten spreads that out into three separate values. This just isn't workable because you're never sure if you're in the "first" map, which needs to be wrapped in a list, or a later map, which needs to be added to the existing list. –  amalloy Jun 28 '12 at 6:27
    
@amalloy: I have updated the code to handle such conditions –  Ankur Jun 28 '12 at 6:48
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(defn value-sets [& maps]
  (reduce (fn [acc map]
            (reduce (fn [m [k v]]
                      (update-in m [k] (fnil conj #{}) v))
                    acc
                    map))
          {} maps))

Edit or maybe

(defn value-sets [& maps]
  (reduce (fn [acc [k v]]
            (update-in acc [k] (fnil conj #{}) v))
          {}
          (apply concat maps)))
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Seeing amalloy's solution involving reduce suggested this to me:

(def maps [{:a 1 :b 2}
           {:a 11 :b 22 :c 5}
           {:c 6 :a 7}])

(defn my-merge-maps
  [maps]
  (reduce (fn [accum [k v]]
            (if (accum k)
              (assoc accum k (conj (accum k) v))
              (assoc accum k #{v})))
          {}
          (apply concat maps)))

(defn -main
  []
  (println (my-merge-maps maps)))

Result is: {:c #{5 6}, :b #{2 22}, :a #{1 7 11}}

(thanks gfredericks for pointing out I was accidentally using varargs. :) )

Edit: And here's another way, using merge-with:

(def maps [{:a 1 :b 2}
           {:a 11 :b 22 :c 5}
           {:c 6 :a 7}])

(defn build-up-set
  [curr-val new-val]
  (if (set? curr-val)
    (conj curr-val new-val)
    #{curr-val new-val}))

(defn my-merge-maps
  [maps]
  (apply merge-with build-up-set maps))

(defn -main
  []
  (println (my-merge-maps maps)))
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And here's a pipelined method:

(defn my-merge-maps [stuff]
  (->> stuff
       (apply concat)
       (group-by first)
       (map (fn [[k vs]] [k (set (map second vs))]))
       (into {})))

Could this be done in maps if we had the right core functions for manipulating them?

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