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I have requirement where my NodeJS http server (on Windows) has to listen on the hostname instead of localhost/127.0.0.1.

For this I need the full hostname (including the domain name) of my Windows machine and I am not able to get the full hostname.

I tried using

require('os').hostname()     

but it does not give me the full hostname.

So I tried the below:

var dns = require('dns');    
var os = require('os');    
var hostname = os.hostname();   
console.log("Short hostname = ", hostname);     

dns.lookup(hostname, function (err, add, fam) {       
    if (err)    
    {    
             console.log("The error = ", JSON.stringify(err));    
             return;    
    }    
    console.log('addr: '+add);     
    console.log('family: ' + fam);    
    dns.reverse(add, function(err, domains){    
    if (err)    
    {    
        console.log("The reverse lookup error = ", JSON.stringify(err));    
        return;    
    }    
    console.log("The full domain name ", domains);    
});    
})     

The above code works fine and I get the below output when I am on the ethernet of my enterprise

C:\>node getFullHostname.js    
Short hostname  =  SPANUGANTI    
addr: 16.190.58.214    
family: 4    
The full domain name  [ 'spanuganti.abc.xyz.net' ]    

But the same code does not work when I am connected to the wireless network of the enterprise

C:\>node getFullHostname.js    
Short hostname  =  SPANUGANTI    
addr: 16.183.204.47    
family: 4    
The reverse lookup error =    
{"code":"ENOTFOUND","errno":"ENOTFOUND","syscall":"getHostByAddr"}   

So need help on the below

  1. Is there a simple way to get the full machine name (Windows) in Node.js
  2. Or please let me know what is the problem with my code above
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2 Answers

Servers don't listen on hostnames, they listen on IP addresses. You should never rely on the contents of the external DNS to figure out where to bind.

The easiest solution is to have it bind to the INADDR_ANY address, which is numerically equivalent to 0.0.0.0.

This would then allow queries on any interface, including the loopback.

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The reason I wanted to have the full machine is because of the following reason: In our staging environment, my server was listening on localhost and the clients were connecting using the machine's IP address and port to access my server. Due to some reason I had to restart my server and by that time the IP of the machine got changed. Now I had to inform all the clients that the IP got changed and they had to change their code to connect to my server. So will binding to 0.0.0.0 solve this problem? –  Surender Panuganti Jun 28 '12 at 4:34
    
@Chary there must be some confusion here - if you were listening on 127.0.0.1 then remote clients can't connect, only clients running on the same machine can. –  Alnitak Jun 28 '12 at 8:55
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You don't need the full hostname to listen on, you actually need your IP address. Check out the os.networkInterfaces() function.

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