Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a c++ code I have a matrix of double variables which I print out. However because all of them different number of digits, the output format is destroyed. One solution is to do cout.precision(5) but I want different columns have to different precision. Also, because there are negative values in some cases, the presence of the - sign also causes problems. How to get around this and produce a a properly formatted output?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Off the top of my head, you can use setw(int) to specify the width of the output.

like this:

std::cout << std::setw(5) << 0.2 << std::setw(10) << 123456 << std::endl;
std::cout << std::setw(5) << 0.12 << std::setw(10) << 123456789 << std::endl;

gives this:

    0.2    123456
   0.12 123456789
share|improve this answer

The key is, as others have said, to use manipulators. What they neglected to say is that you normally use manipulators that you write yourself. An FFmt manipulator (which corresponds to the F format in Fortran is fairly easy:

class FFmt
{
    int myWidth;
    int myPrecision;
public:
    FFmt( int width, int precision )
        : myWidth( width )
        , myPrecision( precision )
    {
    }

    friend std::ostream& 
    operator<<( std::ostream& dest, FFmt const& fmt )
    {
        dest.setf( std::ios_base::fixed, std::ios_base::formatfield );
        dest.precision( myPrecision );
        dest.width( myWidth );
        return dest;
    }
};

This way, you can define a variable for each column, say:

FFmt col1( 8, 2 );
FFmt col2( 6, 3 );
//  ...

and write:

std::cout  << col1 << value1
    << ' ' << col2 << value2...

In general, except in the simplest programs, you should probably not be using the standard manipulators, but rather custom manipulators based on your application; e.g. temperature and pressure if that's the sort of thing your dealing with. In this way, it's clear in the code what you're formatting, and if the client suddenly asks for one more digit in the pressure, you know exactly where to make the change.

share|improve this answer
    
Remember that you need to include <iomanip> to make it find setw () –  user1603472 Jun 18 at 13:37
1  
@user1603472 Yes, but my code doesn't use std::setw. –  James Kanze Jun 18 at 17:10
    
sorry, my bad, i clicked the wrong place, was a quick comment to put in –  user1603472 Jun 18 at 18:13

Use manipulators.

From sample here:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <locale>
int main()
{
    std::cout.imbue(std::locale("en_US.utf8"));
    std::cout << "Left fill:\n" << std::left << std::setfill('*')
              << std::setw(12) << -1.23  << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << std::hex << std::showbase << 42 << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << std::put_money(123, true) << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "Internal fill:\n" << std::internal
              << std::setw(12) << -1.23  << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << 42 << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << std::put_money(123, true) << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "Right fill:\n" << std::right
              << std::setw(12) << -1.23  << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << 42 << '\n'
              << std::setw(12) << std::put_money(123, true) << '\n';
}

Output:

Left fill:
-1.23*******
0x2a********
USD *1.23***

Internal fill:
-*******1.23
0x********2a
USD ****1.23

Right fill:
*******-1.23
********0x2a
***USD *1.23
share|improve this answer

Take a look at stream manipulators, especially std::setw and std::setfill.

float f = 3.1415926535;
std::cout << std::setprecision(5)   // precision of floating point output
          << std::setfill(' ')      // character used to fill the column
          << std::setw(20)          // width of column
          << f << '\n';             // your number
share|improve this answer

Try using setw manipulator. Please refer http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/manipulators/setw/ for further information

share|improve this answer

There is a way using i/o manipulators, but I find it unwieldy. I would just write a function like this:

template<typename T>
std::string RightAligned(int size, const T & val)
{
    std::string x = boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(val);
    if (x.size() < size)
        x = std::string(size - x.size(), ' ') + x;
    return x;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.