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I have a question regarding the iterator behavior in Java.

I have a call such as this:

myIterable.iterator().hasNext()

If this call returns true, can I be sure that the collection has at least two elements? From the Java API specification, I could only find out that true means there is one more element to go which can be reached by next(). But what happens if the pointer is at the very beginning (meaning whether the hasNext() can recognize the first element separately)

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Iterator.html

it says true if the iteration has more elements. But more element could also mean the very first one?

[Edit]

How can I know whether the iterator has exactly two elements to iterate through? Of course, I can iterate and count, but I can't go back or iterate twice or clone the iterator in my case, this is an Hadoop iterator.

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myIterable.iterator() always starts at the beginning of the iteration. –  Louis Wasserman Jun 27 '12 at 12:41
    
If you can store the elements, you can put them in a List (or any other collection) and retrieve the size of the collection using the size() method. You can always iterate through the new collection. Otherwise you will need to get the number of elements another way. –  owlstead Jun 27 '12 at 16:07
    
Note: you don't have to use "thank you" all the time (it's actually policy not to). No need to add [SOLVED] to the question either, you have accepted an answer. You cannot/should not use this to receive less responses, that's one of the side effects of using stackoverflow :) –  owlstead Jun 27 '12 at 16:13
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9 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

hasNext() returning true or false makes you able to discern between zero items and one-or-more (at the start of the iteration that is).

You want to know whether it has two-or-more, without starting the iteration. I think, basically, you can not. Exposing that information is more than an iterator has to do: make available the next and only the next item (and information about whether this item exists).

Possibly, the iterator itself doesn't even have that knowledge yet!

But of course you are free to memorize the items you already took out of the list. Then you could use them later, once you know there's actually two or more items in the list.

If you need to pass the iterator to other code, you could write your own class that implements iterator, internally remembers the first two items as member variables and hands out those first, then continues to iterate over the rest of the items in the original iterator (if there's any more left) - a reference to the original iterator therefore also needs to be stored in your custom made iterator

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the problem is that these two elements can be very big, could not fit into the main memory. What I want is only the knowledge of the collection whether it has exactly two elements or not. That is it, nothing more.Apparently, this is not possible. –  Bob Jun 27 '12 at 13:14
    
Ah, wait I also read now that you need to check if there's exactly two elements. If you can not reduce the size of such an element before passing it on, this will indeed not work. Note that the fact that both elements together can be too big to fit the memory is also the answer to why it is good that your Iterator does not need to know about both of them at the same time either: it too would have to store them in memory... –  Jochem Jun 27 '12 at 13:26
    
What if there's only one element in the iterable object can I use myIterable.iterator().next() to get that object if not how to get that object? –  MMRUser Apr 1 '13 at 11:33
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it can mean the first one. You can only be sure that it has more than zero element

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Otherwise you would never be able to actually retrieve the first element. There is only next(), no current(). –  owlstead Jun 27 '12 at 12:45
    
@owlstead how can I know whether the iterator has exactly two elements to iteratte through? Of course, I can iterate and count, but I can't go back or iterate twice or clone the iterator in my case, this is hadoop iterable –  Bob Jun 27 '12 at 12:53
    
@Gergely, how would I know if iterator will go through exactly two elements without iterating through it? I can't iterate through, because I can't reiterate. I need to know the number of elements before the iteration. This is hadoop framework specific iterable, meaning non cloneable and not reiterable. –  Bob Jun 27 '12 at 12:58
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Bob, it is not reiterable for precisely the same reason that you cannot know in advance its element count. You can't solve it. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 27 '12 at 13:01
    
What if there's only one element in the iterable object can I use myIterable.iterator().next() to get that object if not how to get that object? –  MMRUser Apr 1 '13 at 11:28
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Java iterators are positioned before the fist element. What your expression myIterable.iterator().hasNext() shows is that there is at least one element.

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hasNext tells you there is another element accessible with next(). So it just mean you have at least one element.

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how can I know whether the iterator has exactly two elements to iteratte through? Of course, I can iterate and count, but I can't go back or iterate twice or clone the iterator in my case, this is hadoop iterable –  Bob Jun 27 '12 at 12:53
1  
@Bob: you don't. That's how iterators work :( Besides that, if you think your original question has been answered please flag the appropriate answer, if not then rephrase your question. –  Gergely Szilagyi Jun 27 '12 at 12:56
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If myIterable.iterator().hasNext() returns true it means there is at least one element and you can use next() to access that.

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How can I know whether the iterator has exactly two elements to iteratte through? Of course, I can iterate and count, but I can't go back or iterate twice or clone the iterator in my case, this is hadoop iterable.

There is no way to do this. Maybe an iterator is wrong for your scenario.

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No. If hasNext() returns true means, that collection having atleast one element because the origin position of iterator should before the first element.

List l = new ArrayList();
l.add(1);
Iterator it = l.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
System.out.println(it.next());
}

Result will be 1 because origin position of iterator should before the first element. When we check it.hasNext() for the first time, it will return true because it is having one element. Then, print the element using it.next(). Now only, iterator in the first position. When we check it.hasNext() for the second time, it will return false.

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In the iterator, it has a field named cursor.This cursor init value is the collection object size.When you call the method next(), it will --. The method hasNext() check the cursor is equals to zero.Its zero return false, else return true.

But the list and map is not the same, their difference is the concrete realization, the original is the same.List check size, map check end node.

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Iterator is responsible for iteration behavior over collection.

To identify emptiness of collection, call list.isEmpty().

To identify size of collection, call list.size().

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And to identify that an Iterable is not empty? –  Marko Topolnik Jun 27 '12 at 12:45
    
@MarkoTopolnik I guess it is already clear for everyone. –  JMelnik Jun 27 '12 at 12:47
1  
My point is, OP has an Iterable. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 27 '12 at 12:48
    
The question is about 'Iterator behaviour'. Not an answer. –  EJP Jun 27 '12 at 12:49
1  
@MarkoTopolnik thats what you think and thats what author didn't specify. –  JMelnik Jun 27 '12 at 13:32
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