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how to remove function that bound to member function of this object :

std::vector<std::function<void(int)>> callbacks;

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass() {
        callbacks.push_back(
            std::bind(&MyClass::myFunc,this,std::placeholders::_1)
        );
    }
    ~MyClass() {
        auto it = std::remove_if( std::begin(callbacks),
                                  std::end(callbacks),
                                  [&](std::function<void(int)>& f) {
                return // <-- this is my question
                       //     true (remove) if f is bound to member function 
                       //     of this
        });
        callbacks.erase(it,std::end(callbacks));
    }
    void myFunc(int param){...}
};
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@K-ballo did u meant "can't get that information back" ? –  uray Jun 27 '12 at 13:51
    
Yes, sorry... The function is abstracted out by some kind of type erasure –  K-ballo Jun 27 '12 at 14:07
    
It is advised to call (free) begin and end without qualification, to let ADL do it's job in case the container is not a standard compliant one with member begin and end. –  Xeo Jun 27 '12 at 17:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't in the general case without a buttload of extra work. Type erasure clears this information from the object, and std::function does not expose this information directly.

Your specific example may only have one member function that could be the candidate to remove, but what about a class with 5 members that could be stored as callbacks? You'll need to test for all of them, and it's also possible to bind member functions using a lambda, which is pretty much undetectable.

Here's one solution if:

  • all callbacks are registered from within MyClass
  • the container is amended to store extra information
  • you're willing to do all the extra bookkeeping
std::vector<std::pair<std::function<void(int)>, void*>> callbacks;

class MyClass{
  static unsigned const num_possible_callbacks = 2; // keep updated
  std::array<std::type_info const*, num_possible_callbacks> _infos;
  unsigned _next_info;

  // adds type_info and passes through
  template<class T>
  T const& add_info(T const& bound){
    if(_next_info == num_possible_callbacks)
      throw "oh shi...!"; // something went out of sync
    _infos[_next_info++] = &typeid(T);
    return bound;
  }
public:
  MyClass() : _next_info(0){
    using std::placeholders::_1;
    callbacks.push_back(std::make_pair(
        add_info(std::bind(&MyClass::myFunc, this, _1)),
        (void*)this));
    callbacks.push_back(std::make_pair(
        add_info([this](int i){ return myOtherFunc(i, 0.5); }),
        (void*)this));
  }

  ~MyClass(){
    using std::placeholders::_1;

    callbacks.erase(std::remove_if(callbacks.begin(), callbacks.end(),
        [&](std::pair<std::function<void(int)>, void*> const& p) -> bool{
          if(p.second != (void*)this)
            return false;
          auto const& f = p.first;
          for(unsigned i = 0; i < _infos.size(); ++i)
            if(_infos[i] == &f.target_type())
              return true;
          return false;
        }), callbacks.end());
  }

  void myFunc(int param){ /* ... */ }
  void myOtherFunc(int param1, double param2){ /* ... */ }
};

Live example on Ideone.

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The type isn't completely erased; its type_info is available from function::target_type(). I don't think you can use that to do what the OP wants, but I could be wrong. –  Mike Seymour Jun 27 '12 at 15:27
    
@Mike: True, maybe you could parse the type_info::name() value, but since that is implementation specific, I don't think it'll do any good. –  Xeo Jun 27 '12 at 15:35
    
std::function absolutely does expose the info, see my answer. You can access the target object, if you know its type. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 16:41
    
@Jonathan: Well, not really. It exposes the target type, if you already know it, but it does not expose whether it is a bound member function. And if you already know the target type a std::function stores, what's the reason to ask again? It just does not make sense, really, and as such I find the downvote highly unjustified. –  Xeo Jun 27 '12 at 17:10
    
Is it not reasonable to think you might not know the type of any one particular std::function but know that an object with a given target type is in a list somewhere, you just don't know which element of the sequence it is? Oh wait, that's exactly what the question is about. You said "you cant" and my answer proves you can, so your answer is not useful. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 17:45
    typedef decltype(std::bind(&MyClass::myFunc,this,std::placeholders::_1)) bound_type;

    auto it = std::remove_if( std::begin(callbacks),
                              std::end(callbacks),
                              [](const std::function<void(int)>& f) {
          return f.target<bound_type>() != nullptr;
    });

The member function template std::function::target<T> returns a pointer to the target object if it is of type T, otherwise it returns null. So you just need to be able to name the type of the target object, which you can get from decltype. Pretty simple really :-)

N.B. that will remove any callbacks of that type, not only ones that have bound the this pointer for the specific object being destroyed. If you are trying to prevent invoking callbacks on an object after it has been destroyed and have no possible way to identify which elements of the vector refer to which objects, you could consider putting a shared_ptr in your class, then storing a weak_ptr to it in the callback, which can be used to detect if the object has been destroyed:

class MyClass
{
    struct NullDeleter { void operator()(void*) const { } };
    std::shared_ptr<MyClass> sp;

    static void safe_invoke(void (MyClass::*f)(int), const std::weak_ptr<MyClass>& wp, int i)
    {
        if (std::shared_ptr<MyClass> safe_this = wp.lock())
            (safe_this.get()->*f)(i);
    }

public:
    MyClass() : sp(this, NullDeleter()) {
        callbacks.push_back(
            std::bind(safe_invoke, &MyClass::myFunc ,std::weak_ptr<MyClass>(sp),
                      std::placeholders::_1)
        );
    };

This wraps the call to the member function with the invoke function that converts the weak_ptr to a shared_ptr before calling the member function. If the object has been destroyed the shared_ptr will be empty, so the function does nothing. This doesn't actually remove the callback when it becomes invalid, but does make it safe to call.

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can we make the predicate works for any member function?, which is if I have MyClass::myFunc1 and MyClass::myFunc2 pushed to callbacks vector on constructor, then both functions are removed from the vector on MyClass destructor –  uray Jun 27 '12 at 17:12
    
@uray: No, they are different kinds of function pointers; you would need to remove each individually. –  Billy ONeal Jun 27 '12 at 17:40
    
@uray, only if both member functions have the same type (because if they do then the call wrapper returned by bind would also have the same type, even if it wraps a different instance of the type). If you know the types of all your class' member function then you could make the lambda expression check for all the possible types: return f.target<bound_type1>() != nullptr && f.target<bound_type1>() != nullptr && etc –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 17:48

I once needed to do something like this and I solved it by storing a vector of shared pointers of objects in the class that contain the function and remove the function from the vector by value when they are destroyed, which also makes this automatic.

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