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When you have Math.floor(Math.random()*10)+1 its supposed to pick a random number between 1-10 from what I understand.

However, when I change the +1 to any number higher or lower then 1 I get the same result. Why is this? What does the +1 mean exactly?

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2  
If you add something more than +1 and you still end up with numbers between 1-10 something is very wrong. –  Dave Newton Jun 27 '12 at 14:10
    
What exactly do you mean by "same result"? can you clarify or post some output? –  Salman A Jun 27 '12 at 14:11
    
(To clarify--if you always and only get numbers between 1-10. Obviously any given run might only produce 1-10, but over time, this will almost certainly not be the case.) –  Dave Newton Jun 27 '12 at 14:17
    
"when I change the +1... I get the same result." This question is based on a false premise. I think you know what adding 1 does, but you have some other issue in your code. If you have such an issue, please post your actual code. –  squint Jun 27 '12 at 14:17
    
@DaveNewton: dilbert.com/strips/comic/2001-10-25 –  squint Jun 27 '12 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The random number generator produces a value in the range of 0.0 <= n < 1.0. If you want a number between 1 and something you'll need to apply a +1 offset.

Generally you can use:

Math.floor(Math.random() * N) + M

This will generate values between M and M + N - 1.

demo Fiddle

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3  
not entirely true: due to Math.floor its between M and M+N-1. You need Math.round to have numbers between M and M+N. However, in that case the distrubution is not equal, as M and M+N only have half the chance to roll. –  Christoph Jun 27 '12 at 14:24
    
just for fun: jsfiddle.net/poikl/x5gSz –  Christoph Jun 27 '12 at 15:25
    
You're correct. By "between" I mean "up to but not including", which is technically values in the M <= n < M+N range. –  tadman Jun 27 '12 at 15:52
    
@Christoph Just found walked in on this post from Google, it wasn't until I read your comment that I FULLY understood how Math.floor((Math.random() * N) + M) worked. So, thanks! –  Partack Jul 4 at 19:30

Math.random() generates a random number between 0 and 1.

Therefore Math.random()*10 generates a random number between 0 and 10, and (Math.random()*10)+1 a number between 1 and 11.

Math.floor() drops the decimal of this number, and makes it an integer from 0 to 10.

You can see a sequential progression of the logic here

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Math.random() can also generate 0.9999.... To be exact, Math.random() generates a number between (including) 0 and (excluding) 1. –  Rob W Jun 27 '12 at 14:10
    
To verify, I ran Math.random() four times. It does not only clearly show that a float above 0.9 can be obtained, but also that you can never be sure about randomness: 0.9491507810734872 / 0.9815085749153463 / 0.7040373403047864 / 0.9940599762680827 –  Rob W Jun 27 '12 at 14:13
    
Good point - updated answer accordingly. And yes, but is anything ever truly "random"! –  jacktheripper Jun 27 '12 at 14:14
    
0.9940599762680827 is a float above 0.9, no? –  Salman A Jun 27 '12 at 14:15
    
@jacktheripper Depends on your definition and whether or not you can predict the outcome of quantum mechanics. –  Dave Newton Jun 27 '12 at 14:16

Basic:

(random() >= 0) always true

(random() < 1) always true

(Math.floor(random()) == 0) always true

Maximum:

(Math.floor(random() * 10) >= 0) always true

(Math.floor(random() * 10) < 10) always true

Minimum:

(Math.floor(random() * 10) + 1 >= 1) always true

(Math.floor(random() * 10) + 1 < 11) always true

Max Round:

(Math.round(random() * 10, 0) >= 0) always true

(Math.round(random() * 10, 0) <= 10) always true

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