Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Hi I have a List<decimal> containing values between ]0;1]. I want to check if a total (or subtotal) of these values can equal 1 (or almost).

I can also use Linq functions to filter or manipulate the list.

Desired results:

  • A list containing {0.7, 0.7, 0.7} should return false;
  • A list containing {0.7, 0.3, 0.7} should return true;
  • A list containing {0.777777, 0.2, 0.1} should return false;
  • A list containing {0.33333, 0.33333, 0.33333} should return true;
  • A list containing {0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.3} should return true.

Obviously, I'll want something with the lowest performance cost possible.

share|improve this question
1  
This might be best solved by a flow network – NominSim Jun 27 '12 at 14:21
    
Thank you NominSim but, does a simpler algorithm exists? – Francis P Jun 27 '12 at 14:28
    
To brute force you will need all permutations summed, of which there will be N! It will get expensive quickly without something a little more fancy me thinks. – Adam Mills Jun 27 '12 at 15:04
    
@AdamMills Brute force is N*2^N, not N! – Servy Jun 27 '12 at 15:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

UPDATED -- now doesn't repetively sum try this

bool isClose(IEnumerable<decimal> list, decimal epislon) {
  return isClose(Enumerable.Empty<decimal>(),list,0,list.Sum(),epislon);
}
// Define other methods and classes here
bool isClose(IEnumerable<decimal> left,IEnumerable<decimal> right, decimal leftSum,decimal rightSum, decimal epsilon) {
  if (leftSum>=1-epsilon && leftSum<=1+epsilon) return true;
  if (leftSum>1+epsilon) return false;
  if (leftSum+right.Sum()< 1-epsilon) return false;
  if (!right.Any()) return false;

  for (var i=0;i<right.Count();i++) {
    var skip=right.Skip(i);
    var newItem=skip.First();
    if (isClose(left.Concat(skip.Take(1)),skip.Skip(1),leftSum+newItem,rightSum-newItem,epsilon)) return true;
  }
  return false;
}



isClose(new[] {0.7m,0.7m,0.7m},0.001m); // returns false
isClose(new[] {0.7m,0.3m,0.7m},0.001m); //returns true
isClose(new[] {0.777777m,0.2m,0.1m},0.001m); //returns false
isClose(new[] {0.33333m,0.33333m,0.33333m},0.001m); //returns true

EDIT 5th Test

isClose(new[] {0.4m, 0.5m, 0.6m, 0.3m},0.001m); //returns true
share|improve this answer
    
Can you test it with the 5th expected result (see edited question)? – Francis P Jun 27 '12 at 14:59
    
@FrancisP yes that works... – Bob Vale Jun 27 '12 at 15:05
    
+1 for testing. What do you tihnk about the performance? – David B Jun 27 '12 at 15:19
    
@DavidB The code does shortcut out the moment a result is found and takes pains to short cut branches that cannot produce a result and so will be better than summing every permutation. Use of the Take and Skip operators means that list evaluation is deferred until actually needed. The sum operations are the current slow point – Bob Vale Jun 27 '12 at 15:43
    
@DavidB The new update also gets rid of the excessive summing by passing the sums around. – Bob Vale Jun 27 '12 at 15:51

This is the subset sum problem, a special case of the knapsack problem. It's hard (NP-complete). The best known algorithms have exponential complexity. However there are approximate algorithms with polynomial complexity. These answer the question 'is there a subset that sums to 1±ε ?'

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, i didn't even notice until you flag that! – Francis P Jun 27 '12 at 14:36
    
This isn't subset sum problem, this is harder than subset sum (because in subset sum you working with integers, but here you working with floating points). – Saeed Amiri Jun 27 '12 at 15:16

Here is a rather straightforward, niave, brute force approach. It won't be efficient, but hopefully it's easier to understand.

private const decimal threshold = .001M;

public static bool CloseEnough(decimal first, decimal second, decimal threshold)
{
    return Math.Abs(first - second) < threshold;
}

private static bool SubsetSum(List<decimal> data, int desiredSum)
{

    int numIteratons = (int)Math.Pow(2, data.Count);

    for (int i = 1; i < numIteratons; i++)
    {
        decimal sum = 0;
        int mask = 1;
        for (int j = 0; j < data.Count && sum < desiredSum + threshold; j++)
        {
            if ((i & mask) > 0)
            {
                sum += data[j];
            }
            mask <<= 1;
        }

        if (CloseEnough(sum, desiredSum, threshold))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I benchmarked the solutions and it turns out that the apparently naive brute force methods were the fastest. I revised my solution to borrow part of yours to come up with the fastest, although this isn't as readable as your original solution. – joocer Jun 28 '12 at 18:19
public static bool SubListAddsTo(this IEnumerable<decimal> source,
  decimal target, decimal tolerance)
{
  decimal lowtarget = target - tolerance;
  decimal hightarget = target + tolerance;
  HashSet<decimal> sums = new HashSet<decimal>();
  sums.Add(0m);
  List<decimal> newSums = new List<decimal>();

  foreach(decimal item in source)
  {
    foreach(decimal oldSum in sums)
    {
      decimal sum = oldSum + item;
      if (sum < lowtarget)
      {
        newSums.Add(sum);//keep trying
      }
      else if (sum < hightarget)
      {
        return true;
      }
      //else { do nothing, discard }
    }
    foreach (decimal newSum in newSums)
    {
      sums.Add(newSum);
    }
    newSums.Clear();
  }
  return false;
}

Tested by:

List<decimal> list1 = new List<decimal>(){0.7m, 0.7m, 0.7m}; 
List<decimal> list2 = new List<decimal>(){0.7m, 0.3m, 0.7m};
List<decimal> list3= new List<decimal>(){0.777777m, 0.2m, 0.1m};
List<decimal> list4 = new List<decimal>() { 0.33333m, 0.33333m, 0.33333m };
List<decimal> list5 = new List<decimal>() { 0.4m, 0.5m, 0.6m, 0.3m };

Console.WriteLine(list1.SubListAddsTo(1m, 0.001m));  //false
Console.WriteLine(list2.SubListAddsTo(1m, 0.001m));  //true
Console.WriteLine(list3.SubListAddsTo(1m, 0.001m));  //false
Console.WriteLine(list4.SubListAddsTo(1m, 0.001m));  //true
Console.WriteLine(list5.SubListAddsTo(1m, 0.001m));  //true
share|improve this answer
    
Can you test it with the 5th expected result (see edited question)? – Francis P Jun 27 '12 at 14:59
    
It's O(2^n) since the next number can double the number of sums. However, for small lists - not a problem. For lists with many largish values (above target/2), many of those sums are large enough to ignore. Also, exits as soon as the target sum is found instead of checking all combinations. Lastly, the Hashset discards duplicate sum values. – David B Jun 27 '12 at 15:14

edited: my original code didn't allow for the approximation (0.9999 = 1).

This uses a bitmap of the number of variations to mask the values in the source array in order to brute force all of the variations.

This is about 7.5 times faster than the accepted answer when tested on all five test cases in a million count loop (about 41 seconds vs about 5.5 seconds). It is about twice as fast as David B's sln and about 15% faster than Servy's sln.

    public static bool Test(decimal[] list, decimal epsilon)
    {
        var listLength = list.Length;
        var variations = (int)(Math.Pow(2, listLength) - 1);
        var bits = new bool[9];

        for (var variation = variations; variation > 0; variation--)
        {
            decimal sum = 0;

            bits[1] = (variation & 1) == 1;
            bits[2] = (variation & 2) == 2;
            bits[3] = (variation & 4) == 4;
            bits[4] = (variation & 8) == 8;
            bits[5] = (variation & 16) == 16;
            bits[6] = (variation & 32) == 32;
            bits[7] = (variation & 64) == 64;
            bits[8] = (variation & 128) == 128;

            for (var bit = listLength; bit > 0; bit--)
            {
                if (bits[bit])
                {
                    sum += list[bit - 1];
                }
            }

            if (Math.Abs(sum - 1) < epsilon)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

edit: this NewTest version is 30% faster than the above version and is over ten times faster than the accepted solution. It removes building the array for coming up with the bitmask in favour of Servy's approach which is where the bulk of the improvement comes from. It also removes the Math.Abs call which gave marginal improvement.

    private const decimal Epislon = 0.001m;
    private const decimal Upper = 1 + Epislon;
    private const decimal Lower = 1 - Epislon;

    private static bool NewTest(decimal[] list)
    {
        var listLength = list.Length;
        var variations = (int)(Math.Pow(2, listLength) - 1);

        for (var variation = variations; variation > 0; variation--)
        {
            decimal sum = 0;
            int mask = 1;

            for (var bit = listLength; bit > 0; bit--)
            {
                if ((variation & mask) == mask)
                {
                    sum += list[bit - 1];
                }
                mask <<= 1;
            }

            if (sum > Lower && sum < Upper)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.