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Reusing a previous example, imagine a zoo where newly arriving animals have to be "processed" by the Zookeeper (think of checking them in to the zoo). Each animal's check-in process depends on its class taxonomy (Mammal, Bird, etc).

The processes differ because of the fundamental differences between the taxonomy classes - for example, Birds have wings, Mammals have teeth. You might also have some shared bits of the process which are true for all animals, but I've omitted them here.

Here is the code:

Animal.java

public interface Animal {

    public AnimalProcessor<? extends Animal> getAnimalProcessor();
}

Mammal.java

public abstract class Mammal implements Animal {

    @Override
    public AnimalProcessor<Mammal> getAnimalProcessor() {

        return new MammalProcessor();
    } 

    // Specific to mammals
    public abstract int getToothCount();

}

Bird.java

public abstract class Bird implements Animal {

    @Override
    public AnimalProcessor<Bird> getAnimalProcessor() {

        return new BirdProcessor();
    }

    // Specific to birds
    public abstract float getWingspan();
}

AnimalProcessor.java

public interface AnimalProcessor<T extends Animal> {

    public void process(T critter);
}

MammalProcessor.java

public class MammalProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Mammal> {

    @Override
    public void process(Mammal a) {
        System.out.println("Tooth count is " + a.getToothCount());
    }

}

BirdProcessor.java

public class BirdProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Bird> {

    @Override
    public void process(Bird a) {
        System.out.print("Wingspan is " + a.getWingspan());
    }

}

Badger.java

public class Badger extends Mammal {

    @Override
    public int getToothCount() {
        return 40;
    }
}

Condor.java

public class Condor extends Bird {

    @Override
    public float getWingspan() {
        return 2.9f;
    }
}

ZooKeeper.java

import java.util.List;

public class ZooKeeper {

    public void processNewAnimals(List<Animal> newcomers)
    {
        for(Animal critter : newcomers)
        {
            AnimalProcessor<? extends Animal> ap = critter.getAnimalProcessor();

                        // This line has a compilation error!
            ap.process(critter);
        }
    }
}

MainClass.java

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class MainClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ZooKeeper keeper = new ZooKeeper();

        List<Animal> animals = new LinkedList<Animal>();

        animals.add(new Badger());
        animals.add(new Condor());

        keeper.processNewAnimals(animals);

    }
}

There are no warnings anywhere, but ap.process(critter) cannot compile. I know this is because AnimalProcessor<Bird> is not of type AnimalProcessor<Animal> but I cannot see how resolve the issue. The call to <T extends Animal> getAnimalProcessor() will return a suitable AnimalProcessor<T extends Animal>, but I cannot express this in the code.

Perhaps I should not be pulling the AnimalProcessor out in the first place?

The goal is, of course, to be able to add Reptile, without changing the core.

share|improve this question
    
Why is Animal an interface instead of an abstract class? An interface should be some kind of shared behavior. –  vulpix Jun 27 '12 at 14:40
    
I take your point, and I have changed it in my code - but the compilation error remains. –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
public interface Animal<THIS extends Animal<THIS>> {
    AnimalProcessor<THIS> getAnimalProcessor();
}
public abstract class Mammal implements Animal<Mammal> {

A little like Enum<E extends Enum<E>>.

It may be a better idea to remove the method.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe I've seen this approach before? Does it have a name? –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 14:49
    
Sorry, remove which method? getAnimalProcessor()? How would you make the rest of the code function in this case? –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 14:50
    
I should point out that I deliberately added the getAnimalProcessor method in order to tie together the two parallel inheritance hierarchies (Animal vs AnimalProcessor). –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 14:52
    
In my ideal world, I would not make the Animal know anything about how it is going to get processed... that way I can reuse my animals on Zoo, Farm, or ColouringBook, without having polluting code brought across. –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 14:53
1  
@pjm56 As is you could just replace getAnimalProcessor with process. If you don't want Animals to know about AnimalProcessors, when you construct Animal package it in another object with the relevant AnimalProcessor. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 27 '12 at 15:31

AnimalProcessor.java :

public interface AnimalProcessor<T extends Animal> {
    public void process(Animal critter);
}

MammalProcessor.java

public class MammalProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Mammal> {
    @Override
    public void process(Animal a) {
        System.out.println("Tooth count is " + ((Mammal)a).getToothCount());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Iga - I can see this would work, but was hoping that I could use generics cleverly to avoid the downcast. I think the fundamental reason you cannot dodge this is that the getAnimalProcessor method lets you pull out the processor of one animal, and potentially use it with any other Animal (which may be the wrong subtype). Perhaps it is impossible to 'square this circle' without using casts assertively in places where you are certain types will match. Any style advice on casts like this? –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 15:58
    
You've been upvoted! –  pjm56 Jun 27 '12 at 17:03

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