Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<img src="circle.png" onclick="alert('clicked')"/>

Let's imagine that circle.png is a 400x400 px transparent background image with a circle in the middle.

What I've got now is that the entire image area (400x400px) is clickable. What I would like the have is that only the circle (non transparent pixels) are clickable.

Of course I know that in this example I could use the <map> tag and a circular area, but I'm looking for a general solution which will take into consideration actual image transparency and work for any kind of images (i.e. non regular shapes).

The most complex way I could see is to trace the contour of the image basing on each pixel alpha, convert to a path (maybe simplify) and apply as a map.

Is there a more efficient / straightforward way to do so?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to do this because the images will be dynamically generated? While I'm certain it could be done in javascript, it's probably going to be slow. Having used the "magic wand" and whatnot in Photoshop, it's not trivial to "get it right" either. Seems like if you are generating images dynamically, use the source data to create an imagemap. If you aren't, then why not do it offline and use an imagemap? –  Jamie Treworgy Jun 27 '12 at 15:05
    
Yeah that's going to be dynamically as images will be dynamically loaded too... –  lviggiani Jun 27 '12 at 15:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Using the canvas tag, you can determine the color value of a pixel under a given spot. You can use the event data to determine the coordinates, then check for transparency. All that remains is loading the image up into a canvas.

First, we'll take care of that:

  var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
  var img = new Image();
  img.onload = function(){
    ctx.drawImage(img,0,0);
  };
  img.src = [YOUR_URL_HERE];

This first bit grabs the canvas element, then creates an Image object. When the image loads, it is drawn on the canvas. Pretty straightforward! Except... if the image is not on the same domain as the code, you're up against the same-domain policy security. In order to get the data of our image, we'll need the image to be locally hosted. You can also base64 encode your image, which is beyond the scope of this answer. (see this url for a tool to do so).

Next, attach your click event to the canvas. When that click comes in, we'll check for transparency and act only for non-transparent click regions:

    if (isTransparentUnderMouse(this, e))
        return;
    // do whatever you need to do
    alert('will do something!');

The magic happens in the function isTransparentUnderMouse, which needs two arguments: the target canvas element (this in the click handler's scope) and the event data (e, in this example). Now we come to the meat:

var isTransparentUnderMouse = function (target, evnt) {
    var l = 0, t = 0;
    if (target.offsetParent) {
        var ele = target;
        do {
            l += ele.offsetLeft;
            t += ele.offsetTop;
        } while (ele = ele.offsetParent);
    }
    var x = evnt.page.x - l;
    var y = evnt.page.y - t;
    var imgdata = target.getContext('2d').getImageData(x, y, 1, 1).data;
    if (
        imgdata[0] == 0 &&
        imgdata[1] == 0 &&
        imgdata[2] == 0 &&
        imgdata[3] == 0
    ){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
};

First, we do some dancing around to get the precise position of the element in question. We're going to use that information to pass to the canvas element. The getImageData will give us, among other things, a data object that contains the RGBA of the location we specified.

If all those values are 0, then we're looking at transparency. If not, there's some color present.

Try it out here: http://jsfiddle.net/pJ3MD/1/

(note: in my example, I used a base64 encoded image because of the domain security I mentioned. You can ignore that portion of the code, unless you also intend on using base64 encoding)

Same example, with changes to the mouse cursor thrown in for fun: http://jsfiddle.net/pJ3MD/2/

Documentation

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the effort you've put into this answer. Also +1 because it's a good answer! –  Bojangles Jun 27 '12 at 16:15
    
that's great idea! many thanks! –  lviggiani Jun 27 '12 at 18:20
    
just a cosmetic improvement for isTransparentUnderMouse: return (imgdata[0] + imgdata[1] + imgdata[2] + imgdata[3] == 0) –  lviggiani Jun 27 '12 at 18:22
    
Sure! Technically, you only even need to look at imgdata[3], since that is the alpha channel, so you could make it even simpler still. –  Chris Jun 27 '12 at 18:39
1  
@Chris and I implemented this type of solution today and found a couple of caveats: 1. You have to use FlashCanvas Pro for IE flashcanvas.net, excanvas doesn't support getImageData() neither does FlashCanvas Free –  aron.duby Mar 2 '13 at 0:17

You can do this using HTML5 canvas. Draw the image in to the canvas, attach a click handler to the canvas, and in the handler, check if the pixel that was clicked on is transparent.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, we thought alike on this one, I didn't see your answer because it took a minute to work it all out! Cheers! –  Chris Jun 27 '12 at 15:35

thank you chris for this great answer

I added a few lines to the code to handle with scaling the canvas

so what I do now is creating a canvas of the exact pixel size the image has that is drawn on it. like (for an Image 220px*120px):

<canvas width="220" height="120" id="mainMenu_item"></canvas>

and scale the canvas using css:

#mainMenu_item{ width:110px; }

and the adjusted isTransparentUnderMouse function looks like:

    var isTransparentUnderMouse = function (target, evnt) {

    var l = 0, t = 0;
    if (target.offsetParent) {
        var ele = target;
        do {
            l += ele.offsetLeft;
            t += ele.offsetTop;
        } while (ele = ele.offsetParent);
    }

    var x = evnt.pageX - l;
    var y = evnt.pageY - t;

    var initialWidth = $(evnt.target).attr('width');
    var clientWidth = evnt.target.clientWidth;
    x = x * (initialWidth/clientWidth);

    var initialHeight = $(evnt.target).attr('height');;
    var clientHeight = evnt.target.clientHeight;
    y = y * (initialHeight/clientHeight);

    var imgdata = target.getContext('2d').getImageData(x, y, 1, 1).data;

    if (
        imgdata[0] == 0 &&
        imgdata[1] == 0 &&
        imgdata[2] == 0 &&
        imgdata[3] == 0
    ){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.