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I am forced to use static variables because of the asp.net execution path. I have to have the same variables on the master page as well as the page being called. Static variables make it very easy to carry over variables because they remain static. Unfortunately these variables hang in the ether of memory because the app hasn't actually "exited". Is there a way to destroy these variables when I finished used them? I looked into

IDisposable

but its implementation is not... clean. Is there a way to destroy variables when the page finishes rendering?

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1  
Easiest way is to set them to zero or null. Static variables live for the lifetime of the ASP.NET application. –  Robert Harvey Jun 27 '12 at 15:18
3  
Maybe you should look at the ThreadStaticAttribute class. It allow to create static variable for the current thread and only for the current thread. This can help to avoid conflict between request when changing/reading the value of the variable. –  Steve B Jun 27 '12 at 15:20
    
Why not put them in a class, store that class as a static variable, and set the class to null. Next time you check it, recreate the class and repopulate the values. Might also consider storing them as Dictionary<String, Object> so to remove them would be Dictionary.Clear(). Be careful, though. Static values will be shared across all user sessions for the entire life of the application so cross data contaminiation between different users is possible. –  dash Jun 27 '12 at 15:21
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Do variables have to persist across requests? If not, HttpContext.Current.Items is your bestest friend. –  spender Jun 27 '12 at 15:24
    
@spender I was going to type exactly that! –  dash Jun 27 '12 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I am forced to use static variables because of the asp.net execution path. I have to have the same variables on the master page as well as the page being called. Static variables make it very easy to carry over variables because they remain static.

You aren't "forced" to use static fields just to share data between a master page and its content page. You probably don't want to either: static fields will be shared between all requests from all users of your application, which means they need to be thread-safe and limited to data that is shared between all users.

There are many techniques to share data between master and content page. For example, you could use the HttpContext.Items dictionary, which exists only for the duration of a single request.

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1  
+1 for the right answer, and for typing much faster than me :-) –  dash Jun 27 '12 at 15:25
1  
In my experience, statics are shared across all requests of users that get tied to the same worker process. So if your server is setup as a Web Garden with multiple w3wp.exe process running, that can trip things up as each one can have their own static references. Even more fun if you're in a Web Farm with multiple servers configured to toss individual users around with each request. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 27 '12 at 15:30

For anyone looking for a way to "pretend" static variables, here is how you can go about it:

public static Datatype data
{
    get
    {
        return (Datatype)HttpContext.Current.Items["DATA"];
    }
    set
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Items["DATA"] = value;
    }
}

As far as I understand this doesn't necessary solve the "kill static" values, but it should avoid any data collisions caused by static variables. I had my entire project referencing the static variable and changing it would of created more messy code than should be seen. This way, when the call goes out to get "DATA" from your static object, it doesn't grab whatever pointed at but rather uses the context list which gets killed after and is unique to your session.

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"but rather uses the context list which gets killed after and is unique to your session" - actually HttpContext.Items goes out of scope (aka "gets killed" aka "becomes eligible for garbage collection") after each request - it's independent of Session. But the technique of wrapping an HttpContext.Item value in a property is a good one. –  Joe Jun 27 '12 at 16:27

You can set them to null. If you're using ASP.Net WebForms you can do this inside the Page.Unload event handler.

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Use comments for clarification, not answers. –  Robert Harvey Jun 27 '12 at 15:18
    
@RobertHarvey wasn't done yet, but thanks for the hint. –  Dennis Traub Jun 27 '12 at 15:20

You should avoid using static properties in your master page and use Session[""] variables, they will be destroyed when the user ends the session.

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1  
Session's are evil in cloud environments! –  balexandre Jun 27 '12 at 15:19
    
@balexandre +1 and static variables as well. –  Dennis Traub Jun 27 '12 at 15:20
    
...and load-balanced environments too. –  spender Jun 27 '12 at 15:21
    
We tried this and it only created problems because the Session variable would go null, probably because of our server setup –  Serguei Fedorov Jun 27 '12 at 15:22
    
you are both correct, however, he did not specify. In a single server environment, Session would be his quickest option. –  Steve Stokes Jun 27 '12 at 18:23

Without knowing your setup, and thinking in a future of cloud environment as well, where you can have more than one server answering user requests and, you have no idea if the same server will answer all the requests of that user or the load balancer ask the other servers to continue, I would, as I currently do, give you 2 options

Before the options, in a Web Environment, it is good pratice to stop using Sessions or Static variables (for the reason above)

Use cookies

Why not use a cookie to pass value from one place to the other and when consumed, simply write the expiration data back one year and the cookie is gone!

Use MemCached

I always have a Cache layer between my application and the database, and it's the best way to keep values, not only from the database to provide to all users, but a good way to keep variables when we need cross application.

MemCached is free and runs fine on windows, plus there are several Cloud Services that offer this in their servers

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Yes, i am very much aware of this solution. However the server is handled by a different department –  Serguei Fedorov Jun 27 '12 at 15:31

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