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I am using plain JavaScript on my project. How can I get the value of the following example with the category? I need to detect whether it comes back true or false.

{
    "category": "true"
}

I can get the entire object, but I just want to pull out the value of category.


from comment...

The JSON data is returned from the server based on a form submission. It keeps saying myObject is undefined. How can do I pass this so my JavaScript can read the response?

from comment...

I can get myObject using this: if (form.XHR.status === 200) {var data = form.XHR.response;}, but if I try to do data.myObject it says it's undefined.

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Is that a string, or an object? –  Jonathan M Jun 27 '12 at 16:23
1  
foo.category? Also, try harder .. that is really basic and accessible through any search engine. –  yoda Jun 27 '12 at 16:24
1  
Has your JSON been parsed? If so, is it that you don't know how to access object properties? Or is it that you do know how, but it isn't giving you the expected output. Please provide some relevant information when you ask a question. –  squint Jun 27 '12 at 16:31
    
@am not i am: That was my problem. Thank you! –  Zoolander Jun 27 '12 at 17:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to parse the JSON before you can access it as an object...

if (form.XHR.status === 200) {
    var data = form.XHR.response;

    var parsed = JSON.parse(data);

    alert(parsed.category);
}

Why is this needed? It's because JSON is not JavaScript. The two terms are not synonymous.

JSON is a textual data interchange format. It needs to be parsed into the data structures of whatever language it's been given to. In your case, the language is JavaScript, so you need to parse it into JavaScript data.

When it is received form the xhr response, it is received in the form in which all textual data is handled in JavaScript. That is as a string. As a string, you can't directly access the values represented.

JavaScript has a built in parser called JSON.parse. This was used in the example above to do the necessary conversion.

Some older browsers don't support JSON.parse. If you're supporting those browsers, you can find a JavaScript parser at http://json.org .

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This is what I was missing. Thank you. –  Zoolander Jun 27 '12 at 17:04

First of all you need a variable to refer it:

var obj = {
    "category": "true"
};

Then can you say e.g:

alert(obj.category);
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You can also try obj["category"] –  Ravish Jun 27 '12 at 16:26
var myObject = { "category": "true"};

alert (myObject.category);

But you likely want:

var myObject = { "category": true};

...if you're going to be testing for true/false:

if (myObject.category) {
    // category is true, so do your stuff here.
}
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The JSON data is returned from the server based on a form submission. It keeps saying myObject is undefined. How can do I pass this so my JavaScript can read the response? –  Zoolander Jun 27 '12 at 16:28
    
Show more code. You've got errors in there somewhere. Need to see the ajax call. –  Jonathan M Jun 27 '12 at 16:29
    
I can get myObject using this: if (form.XHR.status === 200) {var data = form.XHR.response;}, but if I try to do data.myObject it says it's undefined. –  Zoolander Jun 27 '12 at 16:32
    
Unless you're just wanting to learn the 1001 ways that an ajax call can go wrong, you really don't need to write your own ajax library. Wouldn't you like to take a look at jQuery or MooTools or some other library that has already covered all 1001 possibilities? –  Jonathan M Jun 27 '12 at 16:35

You can access json object data using '.' or [key] like this :

var obj = {
    "category": "true"
};
console.log(obj.category);   
// Or
console.log(obj["category"]);

Here is the DEMO

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