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If I have, for example, a list of tuples such as

a = [(1,2)] * 4

how would I create a list of the first element of each tuple? That is, [1, 1, 1, 1].

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use a list comprehension:

>>> a = [(1,2)] * 4
>>> [t[0] for t in a]
[1, 1, 1, 1]

You can also unpack the tuple:

>>> [first for first,second in a]
[1, 1, 1, 1]

If you want to get fancy, combine map and operator.itemgetter. In python 3, you'll have to wrap the construct in list to get a list instead of an iterable:

>>> import operator
>>> map(operator.itemgetter(0), a)
<map object at 0x7f3971029290>
>>> list(map(operator.itemgetter(0), a))
[1, 1, 1, 1]
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The tuple-unpacking option is fastest (on my Python 2.7, using a million-element list with no structure sharing in the tuples). The differences are quite small, though. –  larsmans Jun 27 '12 at 17:01

Two alternatives to phihag's list comprehension:

[x for x, y in a]

from operator import itemgetter
map(itemgetter(0), a)
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There are several ways:

>>> a = [(1,2)] * 4

>>> # List comprehension
>>> [x for x, y in a]
[1, 1, 1, 1]

>>> # Map and lambda
>>> map(lambda t: t[0], a)
[1, 1, 1, 1]

>>> # Map and itemgetter
>>> import operator
>>> map(operator.itemgetter(0), a)
[1, 1, 1, 1]

The technique of using map fell out of favor when list comprehensions were introduced, but now it is making a comeback due to parallel map/reduce and multiprocessing techniques:

>>> # Multi-threading approach
>>> from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool as Pool
>>> Pool(2).map(operator.itemgetter(0), a)
[1, 1, 1, 1]

>>> # Multiple processes approach
>>> from multiprocessing import Pool
>>> def first(t):
        return t[0]
>>> Pool(2).map(first, a)
[1, 1, 1, 1]
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1  
+1 for the most over-engineered code to work on [(1,2)] * 4. –  phihag Jun 27 '12 at 16:54
3  
@phihag Never miss an opportunity to use simple examples as way to introduce a full range of Python capabilities :-) I presume the OP will have more interesting datasets to work with ;-) –  Raymond Hettinger Jun 27 '12 at 16:58
1  
@Raymond Hettinger you are correct. In practice I have a list of over 2 million such tuples. –  user1475412 Jun 27 '12 at 20:45
    
@user1475412 If they're indeed tuples, you won't get any performance advantage by using multiple threads or multiple processes, because the cost of calling operator.itemgetter(0) is minimal. A multithreaded approach is only useful if the operation you're applying on each element is slow. –  phihag Jun 27 '12 at 21:06
    
@RaymondHettinger The last example fails on my system with a rather curious error. –  phihag Jun 27 '12 at 21:29
a = [(1,2)] * 4
first_els = [x[0] for x in a]
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3  
Don't use tuple as a variable name. In particular don't use it as the name of a list! –  Sven Marnach Jun 27 '12 at 16:48
    
great catch, fixed –  ply Jun 27 '12 at 16:53

Assuming you have a list of tuples:

lta = [(1,2), (2,3), (44,45), (37,38)]

access the first element of each tuple would involve subscripting with [0], and visiting each tuple to extract each first element would involve a a list comprehension, which can be assigned to a variable as shown below:

resultant_list = [element[0] for element in lta]
>>> resultant_list
[1, 2, 44, 37]
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I recently found out about Python's zip() function. Another way to do what I want to do here is:

list( zip( *a )[0] )

tup_list = zip( list1, list2 ) interleaves two lists into a list of 2-tuples, but zip( *tup_list ) does the opposite, resulting in a list of a tuple of list1 and a tuple of list2.

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