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I'm now writing a Direct3D renderer for our engine.

Here's the problem:
In OpenGL, I can just easily call glClearColor() to clear.
In Direct3D, I need to use g_pd3dDevice just to call ClearRenderTargetView() to clear.

The design of our engine is like this:

class Renderer
{
    // ...
}

class Direct3dWin32 : public Renderer
{
    private ID3D10Device* g_pd3dDevice;
}

class OpenGLWin32 : public Renderer
{
    // Nothing, I can call a function easily without relying on something
}

The problem rises when my ShaderManager class wants to compile the shader. I need to use g_pd3dDevice which is on Direct3dWin32 class.

My question is, what is the best approach on solving this problem? I'm thinking of global variables, a singleton class, or just passing the class in function.

share|improve this question
1  
It isn't clear what you want, but can't you just have a function returning a ID3D10Device*? –  juanchopanza Jun 27 '12 at 16:55
3  
@Dark Do yourself and other coders in your team a favor, never use global variables in C++. –  Eitan T Jun 27 '12 at 16:57
1  
private ID3D10Device* g_pd3dDevice;? Is that C++ or C#? –  Etienne de Martel Jun 27 '12 at 17:19

3 Answers 3

First of all, I can't help but notice g_pd3dDevice, that's not a global. It's a class member pointer to a COM interface of the device, ID3D10Device*, and it's not a global here, nor should it be.

And to answer your question as simple as possible (since it seems like a beginner engine/framework design issue), provide accessor methods which return a pointer to a working device from which it can be passed on further, where it needs to be employed.

A simple example to conform to your little "spec" upstairs:

class Direct3DWin32 : public Renderer
{
      ID3D10Device* pD3DDevice;
  public:
      ID3D10Device* getD3DDevice();

}

Now, whenever you need it, you can just pass it around through functions when you get it from your Direct3DWin32 instance. There's a lot more to engine design than this and I personally wouldn't recommend this as a path to take, but that's a tale for another time and perhaps a series of books.

Note!

You can define the basic stuff like this, but if you really want to take the multiple render paths design to a proper level, you're going to have to introduce polymorphism, adding a nice level of abstraction. Then you can simply define a unified rendering interface that will do the right thing, whether the DirectX or the OpenGL rendering path is currently employed, instantiate a derived class and give its address to the pointer to its abstract base class which contains the specified interface everything conforms to. Then you can render obliviously to the underlying choice of API.

Hopefully this solves your current problem. Also, again, evade globals. And happy coding.

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You could possibly use a variant of double dispatch (a.k.a. the visitor pattern):

class ShaderManager
{
public:
   void compileShader(Renderer* r, Shader* s) { r->compileShader(this, s); }
   void compileD3DShader(ID3D10Device* device, Shader*s);
   void compileGLShader(Shader* s);
};

class Renderer
{
public:
   virtual void compileShader(ShaderManager* m, Shader* s) = 0;
};

class Direct3dWin32 : public Renderer
{
private:
   ID3D10Device* m_device;
public:
   virtual void compileShader(ShaderManager* m, Shader* s)
   {
      m->compileD3DShader(m_device, s);
   }      
}

class OpenGLWin32 : public Renderer
{
public:
   virtual void compileShader(ShaderManager* m, Shader* s)
   {
      m->compileGLShader(s);
   }
}

(I'm not a huge fan of "getters".)

share|improve this answer

You should provide accessor methods for the variables you want to pass into another class.

For instance, in Direct3dWin32, you could have :

ID3d10Device* get_gpd3Device()
{
    return g_pd3Device;
}

You can then pass this into OpenGLWin32:

void useDevice (ID3d10Device* aDevice)
{
// do work
}

Your application that uses both classes would then have responsibility for bridging the gap:

OpenGLWin32 openGL;
openGL.useDevice(direct3d.get_gpd3device());
share|improve this answer
    
Erm, not to be nitpicky, but it's not OpenGL that is interface-based, it is DirectX. OpenGL is a procedural, C-friendly graphics library. You perhaps meant Direct3DWin32 app; app.useDevice(...);? –  user1309389 Jun 27 '12 at 17:10
    
The question is really not bound to any particular library. It's a general question about OO design.I was simply using the OP's variable/class names to exhibit the solution to his problem. –  Tom Thorogood Jun 27 '12 at 17:33

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