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I am trying to copy a property by value so that different instances can modify it separately. My understanding is that using jQuery or Zepto's $.extend is a great way to do 'copy by value'. It is not working in my situation and I'd like to understand why. I can't tell what I'm doing wrong.

var c = [ {'purple' : 1}, { 'red':2 } ]
var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c }
var doWork = function(passX) {
  var inY = $.extend({},passX);
  inY.colors[0].selected = true;
  return inY;
}
var y = doWork(x);

console.log( x.colors[0].selected );// true, but I think it should be undefined
console.log( y.colors[0].selected );​// true

I feel like I might be missing something really central. Can I not extend from the same object to do a copy? Is there something confounding about the function argument scope?

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zfnyp/5/

EDIT: The answer to my confusion, as @Niko points out, is that deep copy makes copy-by-value versions of all child properties. I thought deep vs shallow copy just meant how many properties deep the copy went. Oops.

EDIT AGAIN: Deep copy is troublesome in Javascript. JQuery has it, but Zepto and Underscore do not. Some describe it as impossible to implement well. To implement this for my problem, I have created this solution which relies on knowing the structure of the object. I believe this is the correct answer for me, though it is clunky.

var c = [ {'purple' : 1, 'selected':false }, { 'red':2 } ]
var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c }
var doWork = function(passX) {
  var inY = $.extend({},passX);
  inY.colors = $.extend([], passX.colors);
  for (var i = 0; i < passX.colors.length; i++) {
    inY.colors[i] = $.extend({}, passX.colors[i]);
  }
  inY.colors[0].selected = true;
  return inY;
}
var y = doWork(x);

console.log( x.colors[0].selected );
console.log( y.colors[0].selected );
share|improve this question
1  
you have 2 absolute same objects -- var x = y =... when you assign object to a var. –  mvbl fst Jun 27 '12 at 17:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

x = y makes x and y reference the same object, therefore y.colors also overwrites x.colors - the $.extend() is pretty useless in this case.

var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c };
var y = $.extend(true, {}, x); // <-- first param "true" = make deep copy,
                               //     because otherwise "x.colors === y.colors"

The deep copy is required, because an array is also an object and therefore copied by reference when doing a shallow copy.

Or with the new code:

var inY = $.extend(true, {}, passX); // deep copy = also copy mod.colors by value
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly -- no need to extend as x = y –  mvbl fst Jun 27 '12 at 17:05
    
sorry, the example is bad. the objects are the same reference, but because they are passed as function arguments. Clarifying the example... –  Simple As Could Be Jun 27 '12 at 17:12
    
@SimpleAsCouldBe Yes, but the deep copy still solves that problem (in your example code, x and y are different objects, but the array they contain is still a single one - they just both contain a reference to it, so you need a deep copy to ensure that it is copied by value): jsfiddle.net/n6fzV –  Niko Jun 27 '12 at 17:22
    
@Niko: so without deep copy it still copies the properties, but only by reference? I thought it would leave deep things undefined. Reference would explain everything. –  Simple As Could Be Jun 27 '12 at 17:25
    
@SimpleAsCouldBe Yes, a shallow copy copies everything from A to B, but if A contains a reference to an object (e.g. an array), it just copies the reference. A deep copy also makes true copies of the objects in A, and of objects in those objects, etc. –  Niko Jun 27 '12 at 17:28

You want something like this:

var c = [ {'purple' : 1}, { 'red':2 } ]
var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c };
var y = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c };

y.colors = $.extend([],x.colors);

x.colors[0].selected = true;

console.log( x.colors[0].selected ); // true
console.log( y.colors[0].selected ); // now it's an error because y.colors[0] is undefined

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
there has some error in your code when i try in firebug console: with(_FirebugCommandLine){ var c = [ {'purple' : 1}, { 'red':2 } ] var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c }; var y = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c }; y.colors = $.extend([],x.colors); x.colors[0].selected = true; console.log( x.colors[0].selected ); // true console.log( y.colors[0].selected );​ }; –  Fisher Aug 10 '12 at 8:51
    
the is a unknown ​ in your Demo code. –  Fisher Aug 10 '12 at 8:53

It's not the copy that's causing this, it's the var x = y = {. You're setting y to an object, then setting x to y. That causes x and y to point to the same object.

You need to set the object to one of the variables, then copy it to the other.

var x = { 'name': 'my obj', 'colors': c };
var y = $.extend({}, x);
share|improve this answer
    
The objects are passed in functions in the real use case so they do refer to each other. I'll clarify the example. –  Simple As Could Be Jun 27 '12 at 17:10

No, that is because the variables x and y point to the same object. By setting y.colors to a new value, you will get that when accessing x.colors. That $.extend([],x.colors) is a copy of the original c does not matter here.

But it even would not work if x and y were different objects with different colors arrays. Using

var purple = {purple: 1}, red = {red: 2};
var colors = [purple, red];
var copy = $.extend([], colors);

then copy[0] would still point to purple as just as colors[0] does. You might want to use the deep option:

var x = {name:'my obj', colors:[{purple: 1}, {red:2}]};
var y = $.extend(true, {}, x);
share|improve this answer

The method $.extend can perform a deep copy. All you have to do is add a new parameter in the first position as true -- it flags the deep copy mode -- and shift the remaining parameters right.

var o1 = {"a": "AA", "n": 11, "o": {"k0": "v0", "k1": "v1"}};
var oz = $.extend(true, {}, o1)
oz.o.k0 = 99;

dump(o1); // {a:"AA", n:99, o:{k0:"v0", k1:"v1"}}
dump(oz); // {a:"AA", n:99, o:{k0:99, k1:"v1"}}
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