Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was going through Structure and interpretation of computer programming by Brain harvey. I came across this question which i could not figure out how to do it.

How do we write recursive procedure with lambda in Scheme?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

TL;DR: Use named let (if you are executing a recursive function immediately) or rec (if you are saving the recursive function for later execution).


The usual way is with letrec, or something that uses a letrec behind the scenes, like named let or rec. Here's a version of (factorial 10) using letrec:

(letrec ((factorial (lambda (x)
                      (if (< x 1) 1
                          (* (factorial (- x 1)) x)))))
  (factorial 10))

And the same thing using named let:

(let factorial ((x 10))
  (if (< x 1) 1
      (* (factorial (- x 1)) x)))

The key understanding here is that both versions are exactly the same. A named let is just a macro that expands to the letrec form. So because the named let version is shorter, that is usually the preferred way to write a recursive function.


Now, you might ask, what if you want to return the recursive function object directly, rather than execute it? There, too, you can use letrec:

(letrec ((factorial (lambda (x)
                      (if (< x 1) 1
                          (* (factorial (- x 1)) x)))))
  factorial)

There, too, is a shorthand for this, although not using named let, but instead using rec:

(rec (factorial x)
  (if (< x 1) 1
      (* (factorial (- x 1)) x)))

The nice thing about using rec here is that you can assign the function object to a variable and execute it later.

(define my-fact (rec (factorial x)
                  (if (< x 1) 1
                      (* (factorial (- x 1)) x))))
(my-fact 10)  ; => 3628800

The more theoretical and "pure" way to create recursive functions is to use a Y combinator. :-) But most practical Scheme programs do not use this approach, so I won't discuss it further.

share|improve this answer

No need to write factorial body twice ;)

(((lambda (f)
   (lambda (x)
     (f f x)))
 (lambda (fact x)
   (if (= x 0) 1 (* x (fact fact (- x 1)))))) 5)
share|improve this answer

Here is a recursive function that calculates the factorial of 5 using lambda

((lambda (f x)
  (if (= x 0)
      1
      (* x (f f (- x 1)))))
 (lambda (f x)
  (if (= x 0)
      1
      (* x (f f (- x 1)))))
 5)

When you run this program in Drracket you get 120 :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.