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I was able to write some code with the help of the community here, but I am having a problem where my python runs through the iterations and writting out really really slow as apposed to my other script that does the same exact thing but that one ran super fast, is there anything noticeable in this code that might be causing that?

with open('c:/file.sql') as inf, open('c:/file.txt','w') as outf:
    for i in xrange(47):
        inf.next()       

    for line in inf:
        data = line.split(',')
        if len(data) < 15:
            inf.next()
        elif len(data) > 35:      
            hash = data[13]
            select = hash[3:len(hash)-1]
            outf.write(select + '\n')
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6  
Yes, it's doing disk I/O. That's terribly slow. Without my crystal ball, I can't see the other script, though. –  larsmans Jun 27 '12 at 17:03
4  
Are you deliberately wanting to skip a line where len(data) < 15? Also, for line in itertools.islice(inf, 47, None): is IMHO more elegant than forcing next() –  Jon Clements Jun 27 '12 at 17:06
2  
And hash[3:len(hash)-1] can just be written hash[3:-1] –  Jon Clements Jun 27 '12 at 17:09
    
I am new to this is why I do what one who knows wouldn't >< But thanks for all these tips they sure are helping! And yes I want to skip any line without enough data, because that also skips the line where certain large indexes wont exist, and keep program from crashing because of it. –  Larson Jun 27 '12 at 17:27
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

smaller version of your code:

from itertools import imap, islice
with open('c:/file.sql') as inf, open('c:/file.txt','w') as outf:
    for line in imap(str.strip, islice(inf, 47, None)):
        data = line.split(',')
        if len(data) > 35:
            hash = data[13]
            select = hash[3:-1]
            outf.write(select+'\n')
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For now slicing and striping are lazy –  astynax Jun 27 '12 at 17:11
    
Doing the strip before the islice changes the meaning of the program; what if the first couple of lines are a header with a different syntax? –  larsmans Jun 27 '12 at 17:31
    
larsmans the first lines are headers, by different syntax I don't understand what you mean in that context. –  Larson Jun 27 '12 at 17:33
    
@larsmans, fixed: strip will be applied only for sliced lines. Thanks! –  astynax Jun 27 '12 at 17:55
    
@BrayanHernandez: I mean that the header have a different format than the lines you're actually looking for. I.e., I'm referring to the syntax of your input file, not of your program. –  larsmans Jun 27 '12 at 18:00
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So taking comments into account... I think this is probably what you want:

with open('c:/file.sql') as inf, open('c:/file.txt','w') as outf:
    for line in itertools.islice(inf, 47, None):
        data = line.split(',')
        if len(data) > 35:      
            outf.writeline(data[13][3:-1])
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