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So I know from various online sources that it is generally a no-no to call a virtual function from within a constructor. I realize that the problem here is that the base class will be constructed first and C++ will call the Base class' version of the function first. However I have a unique use case that might be okay with this. I'd appreciate some comments. Consider this situation.

class Base
{
public:
    Base(string data)
    {
        Parse(data);
    }
    ~Base(){}
private:
    virtual Parse(string data);
}

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived(string data)
    {
        Parse(data);
    }
    ~Derived();
private:
    Parse(string data);
}

Let's say I have a setup like this and my expected behavior of each derived class is that:

  1. Parse gets called in the base class to parse out what should be common to all these input strings.
  2. The derived parse should get the data that is specific to the derived class.

Does it make sense to use virtual functions in the constructor in this case? Or am I forced to make "parse" public and call it each time I construct this class? Or are there other suggestions.

I hope this makes sense, and please forgive any syntactical errors above, I'm just trying to express a general idea.

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It's fine. The behavior is completely defined by the standard, relying on that isn't a "no-no". It's only when people naively expect something different to happen that it's a no-no. It may also be a no-no if your colleagues come along later and get confused by your code, though. I'm more concerned whether Parse is actually called from any other functions in Base. If so, then why doesn't it matter that the derived Parse only parses the data specific to the derived class? If not then what's the point of having it as a private virtual function? –  Steve Jessop Jun 27 '12 at 17:28
2  
If it's supposed to work as you describe, why is Parse virtual? –  Anon Mail Jun 27 '12 at 17:29
    
You can still make Parse() virtual in the derived class but call it explicitly from the constructor Derived::Parse(data). –  Captain Obvlious Jun 27 '12 at 17:54
    
I think the reason I made it virtual was because I wanted to ensure that EVERY derived class implements this function as well. The way my specific class works is that each derived class must have this function. I don't want people accidentally relying on the base. But I guess this might not be necessary. Parse is ONLY called from the constructor. –  anoneironaut Jun 27 '12 at 18:21
    
@Anon Mail: If Parse is called directly from the constructor, then declaring it virtual or not makes no difference. However, if Parse was called from some function foo of base class, which in turn was called from the constructor, then virtual behavior of Parse would make a difference. Polymorphism works in constructors, it just works "up to the current class" and no further. –  AndreyT Jun 27 '12 at 18:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution is quite simple:

class Base
{
public:
    Base(string data)
    {
        Parse(data);
    }
    ~Base(){}
private:
    void Parse(string data);
}

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived(string data)
    {
        ParseMore(data);
    }
    ~Derived();
private:
    void ParseMore(string data);
}

When Derived is constructed, the constructor of Base is called before you enter the constructor of Derived. So the parsing taking place in Base will be finished, and you can finish the parsing in your Derived constructor.

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Yeah this is basically what it should be. Although I'm pretty sure both functions can be called Parse right? I don't believe there is anything wrong with that since its private. But using a virtual function here is not the right idea. –  anoneironaut Jun 27 '12 at 23:01

Or am I forced to make "parse" public and call it each time I construct this class?

Actually, in this scenario, since you want to avoid polymorphic behavior, I don't see exactly why you have to make Parse a virtual method, or even a non-static method of the class since it does not modify any data-members of the class itself ... For instance, you could have Parse as a private static method and then simply call ClassType::Parse() in the constructor of each object, and you'd get the same functionality.

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There's absolutely nothing wrong with using virtual functions in constructors, as long as it works for you. It is just important to remember that polymorphic behavior of virtual functions, when invoked from constructor, is always limited to the already constructed subset of the entire hierarchy. (Similar rule applies to destructors).

If this restricted virtual behavior is appropriate for your purposes, they use it by all means.

The "no-no" argument you must be referring to is a well-known fake argument, based on the artificial premise about the user expecting the function of the [not-yet-constructed] derived class to be called. Why some people translate that invented false premise into the conclusion that virtual functions should not be called from constructors is beyond me. I haven't seen a credible explanation yet.

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Don't call virtual functions from constructor. You will not get polymorphic behavior, since Base class virtual table will be used.

If you don't need polymorphic behavior - don't make function virtual

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Questioner doesn't want polymorphic behavior. X doesn't give polymorphic behavior. So what's the problem with X? –  Steve Jessop Jun 27 '12 at 17:29
    
@SteveJessop: I think it's better to make this function non-virtual in that case –  Andrew Jun 27 '12 at 17:31
    
I can just about imagine a situation where you'd want non-virtual behavior of Parse in the constructor only, and virtual behavior elsewhere. However, it's a bit tedious to go into, so I'm going to let the questioner answer the questions asked in the comments above, rather than me providing a reason that might not apply in this case. I suppose even if it does make sense, one could argue that the classes should have a non-virtual function that's used in the constructors and also called in each class's implementation of the virtual function. Avoids any confusion. –  Steve Jessop Jun 27 '12 at 17:35

The simplest solution to this is to use the strategy pattern: define an abstract base class Parser, with a pure virtual function parse, and have the derived classes pass a pointer to an instance of their parser to the base class constructor; i.e.:

class Base
{
protected:
    class Parser
    {
    public:
        virtual ~Parser() {}    // Probably not necessary, since no
                                // one is going to dynamically
                                // allocate any of these, but better
                                // safe than sorry.
        virtual void parse( std::string const& data ) const = 0;
    };

    Base( Parser const& derivedClassParser, std::string const& data )
    {
        derivedClassParser.parse( data );
    }
public:
    //  ...
};

Each of the derived classes will define its parser, derived from Base::Parser, define a static instance of it, and pass the address of this static instance down to the base class.

There is another possibility; it doesn't necessarily work correctly if you have temporary instances of the objects, but it can be useful if for some reason you cannot use the above pattern. Basically, you define a special class which calls the virtual function in its destructor, and has an implicit conversion from std::string (and probably from char const* as well, to support passing string literals), and declare your constructors to take an instance of this class; e.g.:

class Base
{
public:
    class CallVirtual
    {
        std::string myData;
        mutable Base* myOwner;
        friend class Base;
    public:
        CallVirtual( std::string const& data )
            : myData( data )
            , myOwner( NULL )
        {
        }
        ~CallVirtual()
        {
            if ( myOwner != NULL ) {
                myOwner->Parse( myData );
            }
        }
    };

    Base( CallVirtual const& dataArg )
    {
        dataArg.myOwner = this;
        //  ...
    }

    virtual void Parse( std::string const& data ) ...
};

The derived classes should also take a CallVirtual const& as argument. Then, when you create an instance of the derived class:

Base* p = new Derived( someString );

, the string is automatically converted to a temporary CallVirtual, whose destructor will be called at the end of the full expression.

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