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I came across this example class http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/smart_ptr/sp_techniques.html#as_lock and I'm struggling with the syntax.

class shared_lock
{

private:

    shared_ptr<void> pv;

public:

    template<class Mutex> explicit shared_lock(Mutex & m): pv((m.lock(), &m), mem_fn(&Mutex::unlock)) {}
};

I (believe I) understand everything except this part "(m.lock(), &m)". That entire thing appears to be the first parameter to initialize the smart pointer. What does that compound statement evaluate to? Is it simply the address of m? Why is the lock placed there as part of the parameter list (and how is it legal)? Instead, I would have expected a statement like:

template<class Mutex> explicit shared_lock(Mutex & m): pv(&m, mem_fn(&Mutex::unlock)) {m.lock();}

Does my alternate statement change the functionality?

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5  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma_operator –  jrok Jun 27 '12 at 19:23
    
thanks, that pretty much explains it. –  helmk Jun 27 '12 at 19:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What does that compound statement evaluate to? Is it simply the address of m?

Yes

Why is the lock placed there as part of the parameter list (and how is it legal)?

The constructor needs to acquire the lock and it that's a conveinent place to put it. otherwise the shared pointer would have to be set in the constructor's body.

It's legal because expressions, including the comma operator, are used in initializers. The extra parentheses are needed to disambiguate the comma operator from the comma separating parameters, but otherwise most any expression is allowed.

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Ok, I hadn't heard of the comma operator before (or I guess I thought is was specific to the "for" loop). My statement locks the mutex after the shared_ptr has gained ownership, theirs locks it before. Is there any concern about locking in the constructor's body? –  helmk Jun 27 '12 at 19:45
1  
@helmk You run into UB if the construction of pv fails, because the deleter will used to unlock m even though m was not locked. (This is guaranteed by the constructor of boost::shared_ptr that takes a pointer and a deleter.) –  Luc Danton Jun 27 '12 at 19:48
    
ok, that makes sense, thanks. –  helmk Jun 27 '12 at 19:52

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